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java.net.NoRouteToHostException: No route to host

A number of bloggers are reporting a new error message, seen when attempting to publish their blog to an external server
java.net.NoRouteToHostException: No route to host


This error is sometimes seen in networking issues in general, and is generally caused by problems like host name or address being incorrect, or maybe a bad DNS server or a bad router. Those are all conditions that lie within Google.

Keeping an open mind, it's possible that the problem may start with something simple, like the Blog URL / FTP Server settings.

Based on the number and variety of reports being published, the problem will probably be resolved by Blogger Support, but getting the problem recognised by them will likely start with help from the bloggers affected identifying the symptom.

If you are experiencing this problem, some basic diagnostic information (whatever you know and can provide) might be useful, to help Blogger Support identify an affinity. You'll find a number of open threads in Blogger Help Group: Publishing Trouble, where your details provided may make a difference.
  • FTP Setting: Blog URL
  • FTP Setting: FTP Server
  • Name of FTP hosting service.
  • Geographic location of FTP hosting service.


(Update 3/8 18:00): Some bloggers have discovered a workaround similar that used for the other currently hot problem. Clear cache, and publish a post as draft.
Cleared cache. Re-set post to draft status and tried again and Bingo! it worked.


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Comments

Winston said…
I have the same problem. It just started this morning. Sigh.
Dennis S Hurd said…
I didn't get the connection between this domain and Google Blogger help. I'm still unclear. Anways.

my FTP domain: www.DennisSylvesterHurd.com/blog/
208.69.56.61 hosted: cirrushosting.com location: Toronto Canada.

Is there other information that'd help?
Isabelle said…
Same here, since this morning. Havent changed anything since last night and Ive never got this error before...
g4ilo said…
I just noticed it too. Wondered why comments weren't appearing in my blog.
We are switching to word press on our server as of today. I know using word press is stupid but at the same time I cannot afford to keep losing my pictures in blogs, entire blogs disappearing, and now this Java problem with no route to host.

You think Blogger/Google would be able to do this whole FTP upload thing correctly but I be willing to bet it's just because it's Blogger and it's not as important as Gmail or YouTube or the other services Google provides.

Oh well, was fun while it lasted Blogger.
Brian Hayes said…
Just for interest, here's a bit about what Blogger techs are dealing with:

No route to host - socket operation was attempted to an unreachable host.

TCP/IP scenario: local network system generates this error if there isn't a default route configured. Typically, though, Winsock generates WSAENETUNREACH when it receives a "host unreachable" ICMP message from a router instead of WSAEHOSTUNREACH. The ICMP message means that the router can't forward the IP datagram, possibly because it didn't get a response to the ARP request (which might mean the destination host is down).
Chuck said…
Brian,

That's very interesting. What do ARP requests have to do with traffic to distant hosts? Doesn't the default gateway handle this? Are you saying that one of the Google servers doesn't have a valid IP configuration?

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