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Deleted Pages Are Not Recoverable, Like Posts

Blog owners occasionally delete blog content, and later change their mind.
How do I recover a post, after I deleted it from my blog?
Sometimes, knowing the URL - or at least the title - of a post, we can retrieve the post from the Blogger database. In other cases, it may be possible to retrieve post content from a cached newsfeed.

Some blog owners like to construct a blog using static pages - and this presents a bit more of a challenge, when a static page is deleted.

Searching for a deleted static page is not the same as searching for a deleted post.

Static pages are not easily searchable - nor are they cached, as often. They are called "static", for a reason.
  • They don't appear in newsfeeds.
  • They generally don't appear in sitemaps.
  • They can't be indexed using Blogger direct searches.

Static pages don't appear in newsfeeds.
Blog posts appear in the "blog posts feeds". There is no "blog pages feeds", because static pages are not designed to appear in newsfeeds.

Static pages generally don't appear in sitemaps.
Blogger provides the pages sitemap, for optional use. Not many blog owners will host significant amounts of content, that needs indexing, on static pages. Many blog owners (I am one) host content that is not intended for indexing, using static pages.

Static pages can't be indexed using Blogger direct searches.
Static pages do not use labels - so they cannot be indexed in the "/search" section of the blog structure. If you want to search static pages, you'll have to use a cached / custom search.

The bottom line.
If you host significant blog content on a static page, it may be indexed in a cache - but it will, most likely, be indexed less frequently. Let's examine this example, from The Wayback Machine.

The static page was cached 5 times. The blog, in general, was cached 16 times.


The static page was cached 5 times.

The earliest copy would be 2013, and the latest 2014.



The blog was cached 16 times.

The earliest copy would be 2012, and the latest 2015.


When you retrieve deleted content, you want to retrieve the most recent usable copy of the content. Content cached 16 times is significantly more likely to produce a usable copy, than content cached 5 times. And any copies made in 2015 will be more up to date, than copies in 2014.

And the Wayback Machine has not been known to have every blog and website cached. If there's no cache, we might have to look at cached blog feed - and blog feed is only available for posts. Static pages are not published, in the blog posts feed.

All in all, if you ever need to recover deleted blog content, you're going to have a better chance of success if the content was a post - and not a page.

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