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The Review / Restore Cycle Is A Learning Process

As Blogger continues to detect and remove more abusive blogs proactively, we're seeing a gradual shift from blatantly abusive blogs, to blogs that, 5 years ago, would not have been righteously considered to be a problem.

The decrease in abusiveness has several results.
  • It's harder and harder to casually decide if a given blog needs to be reviewed - and if it's likely to be restored.
  • Blogs which are marginally - instead of blatantly - abusive are more likely to be subject to repeated classification and review.
  • The owners become less patient with reviews, as they endure each successive review.

Which ever the possibilities for a given blog, when review is requested, this will require changes in the final review process.

The more times you have a blog repeatedly deleted, requiring repeated review, the more carefully review will be conducted.

Repeated reviews take longer - as the filters become better trained.

It will take longer to get a blog reviewed - and the owner will suffer the consequences. And the automated filters will become better trained.

This process will have benefits.

  • The Blogger Policy Review team will learn, how to review classified blogs better.
  • Blog owners will learn, how to produce informative, interesting, and unique blogs.

The Blogger Policy Review team will learn, how to review classified blogs.

Blogger Policy Review personnel have to keep up with increased internationalisation, and with expanding audiences for various blogs, and resulting easily offended blog reader populations. They have to become more sensitive to the issues of the blogs, and the reader populations, and review the blogs more thoroughly - yet take less time in conducting the reviews.

Blog owners will learn, how to produce informative, interesting, and unique blogs.

As a blog is repeatedly classified, reviewed, and restored, the blog owner will eventually observe what content is not appreciated, and will develop new sources for content. A blog with any future will become less marginally abusive - and will encourage less abusive content, in other blogs.

The long term result.

Eventually, abusive blogs will become rarer - and the lifetime of each abusive blog will become shorter. And Blogger will have less of a reputation as a abusive blog haven.

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