Tuesday, March 31, 2009

New Custom Domains "In Transition" And Following / Friend Connect

We've known about the gestation period of new custom domains, aka "This blog is In Transition", for some time. When you load a blog recently republished to a custom domain, using its existing BlogSpot URL, you get an updated blog - the new domain URL in the internal links, such as the feed URLs in the header - but you get the blog at the BlogSpot URL. The "301 Moved Permanently" redirect from the BlogSpot URL doesn't come about until after the transition period ends.

This helps avoid the well known
Server Not Found

Error 404
when using the BlogSpot URL to address a blog, just published to a new domain, which hasn't propagated through the DNS infrastructure.

Recently, folks using Following started observing an oddity
We're sorry...
This gadget is configured incorrectly. Webmaster hint: Please ensure that "Friend Connect Settings - Home URL" matches the URL of this site.
Apparently this is a condition in Following now, as the blog at the BlogSpot URL tries to load the Following gadget which is, of course, configured for the new domain, along with all of the other internal blog linkages.

Look at the browser address window, in each example below, very carefully.


This is what you get when you view "tsishow.blogspot.com" (right now, anyway).



This is what you get when you view "www.tsishow.com" (until we see some Followers, which are surely coming).



For right now, we may have to grit our teeth for a few days, until the Transition period expires. But while you wait, read why it's necessary, and how it works. It's there to help you and your new custom domain, so become informed.

>> Top

Monday, March 30, 2009

eNom Hosted Custom Domains Suddenly Redirecting To A Parked Server

In possibly yet another episode of the mysteriously broken custom domains that were purchased through Blogger, we have today reports of custom domains which are mysteriously redirected to advertisements for real estate and apartment rentals.

When we look at the DNS addresses, we see parked domains.

mydomain.com. 1800 IN A 69.64.147.214
www.mydomain.com. 1800 IN A 69.64.147.214

69.64.147.214
69.64.144.0 - 69.64.159.255
eNom, Incorporated


In one case, the domain apparently expired yesterday, and the owner didn't get a renewal notice.
I thought they would charge me automatically for annual renewal ... so perhaps my domain name is in limbo because it didn't get renewed??


>> Top

Please Blogger, Restore My Deleted Team Blog!

Last week, I wrote about some exciting news - you now can recover a blog that you deleted, on your own, without any help from Blogger Support! Bloggers all over the world breathe a sigh of relief!

So in an online discussion, someone idly asked
...can any admin use the undelete button..and do all admins get the undelete button when the blog is gone?
and my immediate thought was
Of course not! A deleted blog is locked to the deleting account.
But, I decided to test that idea. And, I'm glad that I decided that.

I took my test blog, and made it a team blog. Bonnie was kind enough to accept membership, and do the test. And, did I get a surprise.

Look, she deleted the blog, and I see it in my dashboard.



And she saw it in her dashboard.



And, I undeleted it.



And now, it's working again.


So, not only can you recover a deleted blog, but any member of a team can recover a deleted team blog.

Kudos, Blogger, you thought this one out correctly.

>> Top

Sunday, March 29, 2009

FeedBurner Feeds Not Updating Promptly

In the midst of the reports about the Atom / RSS feeds in the FTP published blogs having no content, we see a second problem with feeds. Blogs published to BlogSpot / Google, with feeds redirected to FeedBurner, are seeing serious delays in the FeedBurner feed updates. The problem with the FTP published feeds started last Friday and was resolved yesterday; the problem with the FeedBurner feeds started late last week, and is being reported today.

We can compare the native blog feed ("myblog.blogspot.com/atom.xml", which redirects to a FeedBurner feed URL) with the native blog feed, non redirected ("myblog.blogspot.com/atom.xml?redirect=false"), and note the differences in published posts.

Here's an example, taken from 3/28. Here we see the most recent post visible in the feed.

"scatterkeir.blogspot.com/atom.xml?redirect=false" (not redirected)
It Is What It Is

Keir Hardie's 'blog'

Money For Chips
Saturday, March 28, 2009 14:58


and

"feeds2.feedburner.com/blogspot/HQbz" (redirected from "scatterkeir.blogspot.com/atom.xml")
It Is What It Is

Keir Hardie's 'blog'

Cry Me A Liver
Thursday, March 26, 2009 21:00


In this example, the post "Money For Chips", published on Saturday, March 28, 2009, did not get updated in the FeedBurner feed, as of 3/28.

In another example, taken from 3/29:

"proooof.blogspot.com/atom.xml?redirect=false" (not redirected)

Gli studenti di oggi

La scuola dal punto di vista di un prof di matematica

Il quadrato costruito sull'ipotenusa è uguale alla radice del dente di mia nonna
Sunday, March 29, 2009 04:09
Per la serie Dimostrazioni Senza Parole, ecco qua un famoso teorema:


yet, "feeds2.feedburner.com/GliStudentiDiOggi" (redirected from "proooof.blogspot.com/atom.xml")
Gli studenti di oggi

La scuola dal punto di vista di un prof di matematica

Altro che tesina d'esame
Tuesday, March 24, 2009 12:52
Keplero ha pubblicato un link, segnalatomi poi anche da Marcello Seri, relativo a uno studio compiuto da alcuni studenti del Liceo Scientifico “A. Vallisneri” di Lucca: analizzando le registrazioni in mp3 delle comunicazioni tra Neil Armstrong (sulla luna) e il controllo di Houston (sulla terra) hanno notato che le parole trasmesse da Houston, riecheggiando all'interno del casco dell'astronauta, rientravano nel suo microfono e venivano ritrasmesse a terra, creando un'eco.


In this example, the post "Il quadrato costruito sull'ipotenusa è uguale alla radice del dente di mia nonna", published on Sunday, March 29, 2009, did not get updated in the FeedBurner feed, as of 3/29.

(Update 3/31): Blogger now states that this has been fixed.
Update: As of 3:05pm PST 3/31/09, this is fixed.


>> Top

Saturday, March 28, 2009

Diagnosing Problems With Your Blog

In Information Technology ("computer" / "Internet") organisations with any size or complexity, one of the fastest growing groups in the organisation will be Change Management. The job of Change Management is to coordinate all changes in the product that involve more than one component of the product. This is because any change that involves multiple components generally involves changes made by more than one person or group in the organisation.

Your blog is a complex structure, and frequently can be as complex as any moderate sized IT product (yes, really). You have an edge over many IT organisations, though - you own and control your blog (though you don't control the changes made by Blogger, which can contribute to your observed problems). You, personally, don't (probably don't) need a Change Management staff, but you could do well to use Change Management principles, when making changes to your blog. Having well documented changes can help you triage problems, and reliably state which problems are caused by you, or by Blogger.

Besides using change management before making changes, you can do structured analysis, when problems are detected. Many different Blogger problems can be solved with this approach.
It's not a complicated approach, and can help you to avoid a lot of frustration.
  1. Does the blog have a third party accessory, or a tweaked Blogger template? If so, roll back to a standard Blogger template, before continuing.
  2. What change did I just make? Maybe just publish a post?
  3. Remove that change. If a post was just published, edit that post and save it as a draft.
  4. Did the problem go away? If so, figure out where you went wrong with that change.
  5. If the problem did not just go away, look at the previous change, then go back to Step 3.
  6. And so on.


That's a simple technique. With blogs, it can be approached based upon blog structure. Since blogs contain two separate but equally important sections of code - the blog template and the post template, you can frequently isolate a problem by separating the two in your diagnosis. Compare a view of the main page, with views of the individual posts.
  • If you see the problem in all views, the problem is likely in the sidebar, or the blog template.
  • If the problem is NOT visible in even one individual post view, the problem is, most likely, in the multiple individual posts where the problem is seen.
  • Note: In one extremely odd situation, the problem was in a post title, and became active when the post title appeared in the sidebar, in the Previous Posts list.


In a third alternative, you could setup a new blog (blogs are free), with a clean copy of the same template.

There are other, equally as obvious, and as useful, approaches too. Understanding blog structure is important. Here's one place where having the sidebar at the left, or at the right, side of the blog will make a difference. With the sidebar at the left of the blog, a problem in a single post will generally not affect sidebar display. Conversely, a problem in a single post can affect sidebar display, with the sidebar to the right side.

There are also general principles that should be noted. When you ask for advice, and are given some basic settings which you can start from, try those settings with an open mind. And unless otherwise instructed, leave those settings in place until you're told to change them again. Don't make the changes, see that they don't work, immediately change them on to something else, then post back in the forum
That didn't work. Does anybody else have any suggestions?
Some problems require multiple diagnostic steps, including more testing with the first set of changes in place.

You don't have to have a degree in Information Technology, or be a senior manager in a major software company, to produce a blog. Most blogs are produced by people of neither persuasion. But you can use principles and techniques known and respected by both, and be free to customise, and to write more content, because you spend less time in Blogger Help Forum Something Is Broken, yelling
Help me!


>> Top

Atom / RSS Feeds Are Empty - Again

Once again, we have several reports from bloggers who publish blogs to external servers, using FTP.
Tha file at http://www.blogger.com/feeds/8073700612434047107/posts/default is ok. But the files in my FTP (http://www.afnews.info/public/afnews/rss.xml and atom.xml) are at 0.
and
I noticed on my server that although Blogger is writing the postings to the correct path and archives on my server, and although the progress screen says it is writing to the files atom.xml and rss.xml on that server, in fact these files are remaining at 0 bytes.


This problem, first seen a couple weeks ago, and fixed shortly after it was seen, has returned.

(Update 13:00): Blogger has declared this issue fixed.
Update: This has been fixed.
As with the previous occasion, I suggest that you republish your blog.

>> Top

Friday, March 27, 2009

Please Blogger, Restore My Deleted Blog!

Recently, we've seen a lot of bloggers admitting to their mistakes.
I deleted the wrong blog! I had two, one was a duplicate of the other, but I wanted to keep the one that I deleted! Help!!
or
I had my two year old on my lap. She grabbed the mouse, and deleted my blog while I was talking on the phone. What do I do now?
And the answer, long ago, was
Post the URL of the blog, and we will see if Gatsby will read here, and take pity on you.

That changed, some time ago. Now, you simply need to login to Blogger, using the right Blogger / Google account, and look for the "Deleted blogs" link to the left of the dashboard blog list.

Thursday, March 26, 2009

Sometimes, You May Need A Lawyer

As blogging becomes more and more a way of life, for non technical as well as technical people, there will be culture and personality clashes between individuals, conducted through blogs. And legal ownership of blogs will become relevant in court proceedings.

Recently, we've been seeing various complaints and queries
You need to remove "xxxxxxx" blog, they are publishing details about me and about my family.
and
The contents of blog "xxxxxxx" is taken from my blog "yyyyyyy". I need this to stop, but I can't find contact information for the owner. Can Blogger contact the owner and have this stopped?
and
My brother / sister / mother / father died recently. I need access to his / her blogs. Who do I contact at Blogger, to get this resolved?


In some cases, and when there are egregious enough offenses, Blogger may take action on your behalf. The improved "Flag Blog" wizard offers new choices, where you may specify the offense that you believe is being committed. Of course, action taken will be at the discretion of Blogger, and Blogger acts under the laws of California, and of the USA in general. Both "Due process of law" and "Innocence until proven guilty" are important principles here.

If you, or your family, are seriously threatened by the content of a blog, you may be better off contacting a lawyer who is skilled in Internet issues. As the Internet becomes a part of our daily lives, not just an occasional recreation, the public legal system has to become involved, in arbitrating clashes and conflicts.

The Blogger "Report Abuse" wizard provides solid guidelines about the possible scenarios, and when we can expect action from Blogger / Google.

In some cases, when the content of a blog seems to predict real bodily injury to you, Blogger will even advise you to contact your local law enforcement agency for protection. If those threatening you are serious, their actions will fall under the jurisdiction of the local authorities - and it's likely that your reporting a serious crime, before it's committed, will help your local law enforcement agency prevent worse problems. When you do report a threat, be calm and objective, and accept the advice of the officials who interview you - because you will need them on your side.

In other cases, legal ownership of blogs, left behind when someone dies, may be of interest to you. Here, unless the deceased acted with foresight and included the blogs in a will, you may also need the services of a lawyer, and / or litigation in the courts.

>> Top

Wednesday, March 25, 2009

Why We Should All Moderate Comments

I moderate my comments to my blogs, avidly. I was, therefore, flattered to get this first bit of praise, months ago
sheela has left a new comment on your post "Publishing Your Blog Externally":

I recently came accross your blog and have been reading along. I thought I would leave my first comment. I dont know what to say except that I have enjoyed reading. Nice blog. I will keep visiting this blog very often.

Kaylee

http://www.(spamurlremoved).info

This looked a bit light on detail - but it was positive in general, so I Accepted it as a comment.

A few hours later, another comment, worded the same, hit another post. And the following day, a third comment, with a third post targeted. By then, it was looking pretty obvious. I went back and deleted the other two published comments, and I figured that would be the end of it.

Not.

I recently went back through my Comments Inbox, and checked for "Nice blog. I will keep visiting this blog very often.". I had a total of 8 entries, the latter 6 quickly rejected.

Yesterday evening, I idly wondered if other people had gotten any of this too, or was I being targeted uniquely? Surely, I was so gullible in Accepting the first 2. So, I decided to "Just Google It", and find out for myself.

Results 1 - 10 of about 22,700,000 for Nice blog. I will keep visiting this blog very often.


There you see 10 of the 22,700,000 successfully installed spam comments. Knowing these spammers, I'll bet that they used other phrases too, in other spam comments. How many spam comments, in total, were successfully installed in the Blogger blogosphere? Outside the Blogger blogosphere? Anybody? Bueller?



Nope. I guess I wasn't the only one targeted by this scam. I wonder how many folks Rejected theirs. LOL. Not everybody, obviously.

This is spam that Google won't regulate, or even assist in stopping. It's our responsibility to remove, and block, this. And get ready for what will follow.

Moderate comments, or else! Help yourself, and other blogs owners - help train the new comment filters. And, update your Blogger account to use a Google+ profile, so you can publish comments safely and discourage this spam.



2012/06/23:
344,000,000
Nope, not stopping.


If we analyse the various spam attacks upon our blogs, we can see patterns - and an understanding that there is likely actual purpose for the spam.

>> Top

Tuesday, March 24, 2009

The Blogger Login Problem And The Maximum MTU Setting

Recently, we've been seeing a small but steady trend of complaints about logging in to Blogger.
I can see my blogs, but if I try to Log on: "no can do" - it's like blogger.com does not exist.

After waiting for ages, the browser finally lets me know that the page cannot be viewed; suggesting that I may, perchance, have misspelled the address, or that the site may be "down".

or
I have tried different browsers, I have installed updates, I have changed and tried out every single setting, I have reset and uninstalled updates and changes on my computer, I have tried everything, and the browser refuses to go to Blogger.com.

or
I can`t log in to my blog. It was no problem yesterday morning,but in the evening and today I can`get in. Just get an error on the page. I can see my blog, but not login to it.

and later, a brief bit of crucial diagnostic detail
Here's what I see
Opera could not connect to the server. Maybe the server doesn`t use the supported SSL-protocol, which is not safe enough for safe communication. The owner of the server should upgrade to TLS.1.0 or newer.


All of these symptoms, taken together in general, and with the latter in particular, point to an MTU setting problem on the blogger computers, and probably to a problem router or server at Google.

Any time you have a network connectivity problem which comes and goes, and which may possibly focus on screens (like Blogger login) that use the HTTPS protocol (TLS 1.0 in Opera language), you should suspect an MTU setting problem. An MTU setting problem is arbitrary and capricious, and comes and goes randomly. One scenario when it will commonly show up is with someone logging in to a server and using HTTPS, because the HTTPS protocol adds information in the packet header, and makes the packets larger.

If your MTU setting is marginal, or optimised carefully for HTTP traffic (which is 99% of your browser activity), and your network is susceptible to an MTU problem, the overhead generated by HTTPS will likely push your network over the edge, and you get the familiar symptoms (well, they're familiar to me, anyway).

Now, it's time for you to check the MTU setting on your computer, and target "www.blogger.com" for the tests.

>> Top

The Blogger Dashboard

The Blogger dashboard is at the center of your Blogger world. From the dashboard, you access all portions of your blogs, as permitted by your role in each blog. Besides the blog based links, you also have the language selection pulldown menu, the Following Reading List, and a collection of useful Blogger links.

You can access your dashboard from the navbar, on any blog. At the far left of each navbar, the Blogger "B" links to your dashboard. For any blog that you are not an administrator (and thus don't have a "Customize" link), you'll have a "Dashboard" link instead. Or you can start from "www.blogger.com", in the address window of your browser.

If you're not logged in to a Blogger (Google) account, that's what you do first. If you're logged in, you go straight to the dashboard. How you log in to Blogger affects what you see on your dashboard.


I have administrative access to this blog, "The Real Blogger Status", so I have buttons / links to


For any blog that I am not an administrator, my display will be slightly different.

At the bottom of the dashboard, you'll find an assortment of useful (and possibly not safe) links. Under "Tools and Resources", you'll find a link "Webmaster Tools". Right now, I would avoid this link, until Blogger explains some odd circumstances, which have recently damaged a few blogs. Manual verification of individual blogs seems safer, right now.

>> Top

Saturday, March 21, 2009

403 Forbidden - March 2009

This week, we're seeing more reports of the return of an old friend (not)
We're sorry...

... but your query looks similar to automated requests from a computer virus or spyware application. To protect our users, we can't process your request right now.


When asked about this in the forums in the past, Blogger has described it as a problem with "fuzzy detection". Like many chronic Blogger problems, it doesn't have a simple solution.

Google, like every large Internet presence on the face of the earth, is constantly under attack. If the bad guys use a large and varied army of botted computers, the Google attack detection servers have to look for a pattern in the attack. In some cases, they will see an attack coming from a block of Internet addresses. You may be unlucky enough to have your connectivity using an address similar to the block detected in the attack, and the fuzzy logic will see your address as part of the attack.

If you seem to be affected by this detection more often, that may not be your imagination. Internet advertising being what it is, a certain type of Internet customers are attracted to certain ISPs. A large ISP, with customers more interested in high bandwidth and file sharing, will provide good targets for the bad guys. The bad guys use can file sharing to hack their victims computers, giving them lots of new botted computers, which they can then use to launch their attacks against Google and other corporations.

If you are using the same Internet service as your neighbours (maybe not those geographically near you), even though you may not do file sharing so intently, and you may keep your computer clean, you may still be seen as a possible attack vector by Google, simply because you are part of the same address block as a detected botnet which may be actively in use.

When you see this error on your screen, you could consider this a wakeup call, and seek reliable and professional help, like DSLR Forums - Security Cleanup - if you're at all uncertain about the status of your computer. The advice provided at Security Cleanup is free, but the helpers there are carefully moderated, and they are very professional and respectful to those asking for help. Observe the *Mandatory Steps Before Requesting Assistance*, and you'll be starting properly there.

Also, remember that, unless your readers are very homogenous in their Internet access and use, even though you see this error, it's not a given fact that this error is affecting access to your blog, specifically. This error appears to have an affinity based upon Internet access, not upon Internet content.

>> Top

Friday, March 20, 2009

Allow Comment Posting Through Email

If you're like me, you moderate comments that are being posted to your blog. How many times have you needed to reply to a comment, after you moderated and published it, but just didn't feel like making the effort.
  • Open the post in question.
  • Scroll to the bottom of the post and the comments (or open the commenting screen / window).
  • Enter a reply in that little tiny box.
  • Hit "Post Comment".
  • Wait to see if the comment posts, or do you again see
    Your reply could not be processed.
You're in your email program, why can't you post a reply, to a comment just published, through email?
  • Hit "Reply".
  • Compose your reply.
  • Hit "Send".
  • Get on with life.


Tell Blogger to allow us to post replies to comments through email, as we moderate through email.

>> Top

Thursday, March 19, 2009

Custom Domains and Case Significance

As I've said repeatedly, Google Custom Domains depend heavily upon DNS. In the DNS server world, there are two dominant players - Windows (which is provided by Microsoft), and Unix (which is provided by many different players). Just like USA politics (the Democratic party vs the Republican party), USA leading soft drinks (Coco-Cola vs Pepsi-Cola), and other dichotomies, the differences between the players are sometimes subtle (in appearance) but major (in effect). The Windows vs Unix dichotomy has a major effect on the success of your custom domain.

The BlogSpot alias for this blog is "bloggerstatusforreal.blogspot.com". That's a mouthful, isn't it? To make it more readable, and maybe get name recognition sometimes, I might spell it as "BloggerStatusForReal.BlogSpot.Com".

In the Unix world, "bloggerstatusforreal.blogspot.com" would not be considered the same blog as "BloggerStatusForReal.BlogSpot.Com". In the Windows world, however, "bloggerstatusforreal.blogspot.com" would be considered the same blog as "BloggerStatusForReal.BlogSpot.Com".

We say that Unix observes case, and that Windows preserves case. You can, if you wish, read the HP white paper, Case Sensitivity versus Case Preservation in CIFS Server, for an in depth discussion of the overall issues.

If Blogger / Google used only Unix servers, it's possible that the two URLs - "bloggerstatusforreal.blogspot.com" and "BloggerStatusForReal.BlogSpot.Com" - could refer to two different blogs. Since most bloggers use Microsoft Windows, Blogger has to consider the two spellings, and other variants - "BloggerStatusForreal.blogspot.com", "BloggerStatusFORReal.BlogSpot.Com", and so on - all refer to the same blog.

Besides the unpredictable nature of the clients (blogger computers), and a possibly relevant assortment of computers running Unix and Windows in the Google infrastructure, there's a third detail - in DNS, Google servers don't function solely as servers. The DNS servers that we depend up to host our custom domains DNS addresses are the ones that Google depends upon too. Those servers, provides by a variety of Internet entities, will definitely be running a mixture of Unix and Windows.

And there is where one problem starts.

>> Top

Wednesday, March 18, 2009

Manage Your Followers, Carefully

Blogger Following, like Google Friend Connect, is a great way to let you the blog publisher have some idea what your readers are like. It's an example of what the web is good for - connecting people. Unfortunately, some people doing the connecting don't have honourable intent. Blogger Following, like everything else on the web, can be subverted by the hackers, porn merchants, and spammers. But not if we don't let them do so.

Fortunately, Following is going to require more effort by the spammers, and it will take longer to produce results that they will appreciate. And we can prevent their effort from producing their desired results. All that we have to do is examine our Followers list, and Block any undesirables.

If you are properly logged in to Following within your blog, you'll see your icon at the top of your Followers window. If you're not logged in, you'll see a link to "Sign in". Click on the link, and sign in.

Seeing your icon in the Followers window, you have only to click on a Followers individual icon, and the profile for that Follower will open in the Follower window. Right at the top of the Followers profile, next to their icon, you'll see a link to "Block this user".

Alternately, start from your profile dashboard. Any popular blog will show a count of the Followers for that blog - and the count will contain a link. Clicking on the link takes you to the Followers list for the blog. Clicking on the icon for any Follower gives you the profile for that Follower. If you are an administrator for that blog, you should see a link to "Block this user".

Remember, when you "Block this user", you simply remove the icon and link from your Followers community. Anybody who wishes to Follow your blog (ie subscribe to the blog feed) can do so with impunity - a blog feed, available to anybody, is available to everybody. And there's no way to disable the links attached to the icons either - if you can see them, your readers can link to them.

Note two additional details about blocking Followers.
  1. You cannot block a Follower who is an administrator, for the blog in question.
  2. You cannot block any Followers, for any given blog, if you are not logged in to Following, using a Blogger or Google account that has control of that blog.


Watch your Followers community regularly, and eventually you'll get an instinct for which Followers are genuine, and which ones are Following you simply to get a backlink to their splog. Keep your Followers list clean, and those who Follow you will appreciate it. And likewise, those who you Follow will appreciate it.

And besides keeping a careful eye on your Followers, it's a good idea to remove any blogs which you don't care to Follow, or that may change content. Using the "Manage" button at the bottom of the Reading List, you can change any Following relationship between public and private, or stop Following, altogether. Keeping your Reading List clean (of blogs that you don't really care about) will help you enjoy the blogs that you Follow (and that you do care about).

>> Top

Tuesday, March 17, 2009

New Owners Of Custom Domains, Purchased Through Google, Lack Google Apps Or DNS Manager Access

Setting up a Google Custom Domain, and publishing your blog to a non-BlogSpot URL, is an exciting prospect for many bloggers. Part of the excitement, after using the "Buy A Domain For Your Blog" wizard, or from Google Apps, includes receipt of an email from Google Apps, giving instructions on logging in to Google Apps, and giving us access to the DNS Manager wizard for the domain registrar (eNom or GoDaddy). And providing positive proof that he / she is now the owner of the domain.

Recently, we've been seeing reports from unhappy bloggers who report
I have only received the mail of confirmation of the purchase and of spending the $10 USD, but nothing else.
This discovery is made generally when the blogger reports a problem with the domain, and when advised to correct it using the Domain DNS wizard, replies that he has no access to the DNS wizard, and in some cases, no access to Google Apps either. In other cases, the blogger may have access to Google Apps, and an account / password to the registrar's DNS Manager, but the DNS Manager access doesn't work.
When I follow the above instructions (trying to login to the DNS manager), I get this message.
The domain name mydomain.com is not active and can not be updated or renewed through this site.
Please contact us for assistance.
Please advise.


If you are a blogger who is making this unfortunate discovery, please provide some basic details:
  • What is the domain URL (Please!)?
  • When did you purchase the domain?
  • Did you use "Buy A Domain" or Google Apps?
  • Did you receive any email? From Google Apps? From the registrar? What did you receive?
  • Who was the registrar - eNom or GoDaddy?
  • If you were able to login to Google Apps, were you able to login to the registrar DNS wizard?


>> Top

Monday, March 16, 2009

Your Blog, Custom Domains, And Top Level Domains #2

This blog, "blogging.nitecruzr.net", is a domain under the generic Top Level Domain ".net". There are many Top Level Domains on the Internet, some generic, others country related.

When we setup a new domain, we purchase the domain through a registrar. Registrars maintain the necessary relationships with the operators of the various TLDs. Not all registrars maintain a relationship with every TLD in the Internet. Some country code TLDs, such as ".me" and ".to", have a lingual value which makes them of interest to people outside the country which is associated with the TLD itself.

The ".me" (Montenegro) and ".to" (Tonga) TLDs are ones which use two letter abbreviations which are meaningful in the English speaking world; similarily, there have been other TLDs popular in French and Spanish. Registering a domain in such ccTLDs may command a premium price because of their popularity, just as some generic TLD domain names have been.

If you purchase a domain using the "Buy A Domain" wizard, you'll have a limited selection of generic TLDs.


If you want to register a domain which does not use one of the five gTLD selections pictured (".com", ".net", ".org", "info", or ".biz"), you'll have to contact a registrar which registers the domain of interest to you. Not all TLDs will be registered by all registrars, some exotic ones may be supplied by only a handful of registrars, and some TLDs just won't be available. The ".mil" TLD is operated by the US military; it's rather unlikely that if you are reading this for knowledge, you'll be eligible for a domain in the ".mil" TLD.

Your choice of a registrar may affect your ability to publish your blog to a custom domain. Some registrars may provide DNS hosting that makes your custom domain problematic. Consider your domain URL carefully, when setting up your blog.

>> Top

Feed Gadgets Not Displaying Content

Last week, we (some of us) suffered through a feed problem, with blogs published externally using FTP. Over the weekend, we started seeing a new problem with feeds.

Look at the sidebar in this blog, and at "Blogger Status" and "Known Issues for Blogger". Both of those sections are feed gadgets. 1/2 hour ago, the latter section "Known Issues for Blogger" looked as the former "Blogger Status". In an effort to diagnose the problem, I removed and re added the feed gadget for "Known Issues for Blogger", and now have what you see.

If you are seeing either symptom in a feed gadget, whether the gadget is blank, or shows "Loading...", or shows a subject index which contains no detail and no clickable links, please help us (and yourself) out, with details.
  • What's the blog URL?
  • What's the title on the feed gadget, as seen in the blog?
  • What's the feed URL?
  • Is this a redirected feed (FeedBurner et al), if so, what's the redirected feed URL?
  • When did you last update the feed gadget?
  • When was the latest post in the blog?
  • Is this your blog, if so, did you try removing and readding the feed gadget?


>> Top

Sunday, March 15, 2009

Make New Posts Publish Below Old Posts

Every week, some hopeful blogger asks
How do I make my newer posts post below the old posts?
or
I want my oldest post to show up when the blog opens. How can I do that?
and the answer given, unfortunately, is simply
Change the dates on the posts.


That is a rather lame answer, if you think about it. Why couldn't the Blogger code just use ASC in the ORDER BY clause for the dates?

This would even provide a solution for one of my favourite private wishes. Give us the ability to have a permanent Home page for a blog. If the oldest post became the displayed post when the blog is opened, there's your Home page. Badda bing.

The Welcome post is good for small messages, constantly visible. But the Welcome post isn't universally useful - it doesn't use labels, large Welcome posts take up too much screen space, and sometimes, you only want the welcome to show up once. That's what the Home page is for.

This is yet another item for the Blogger Wishlist. Tell them, please.

>> Top

Saturday, March 14, 2009

"Blogs may not be hosted at naked domains" - Fixed

We are seeing reports from relieved bloggers that their custom domain published blogs are now accessible, from both the domain root ("naked domain") and from the "www" alias. The earlier error, "Blogs may not be hosted at naked domains", appears to be resolved, for at least properly configured DNS addresses.

Now, other matters, such as FTP Publishing with inoperative feeds, await the attention of Blogger Support.

>> Top

Friday, March 13, 2009

Your Browser and Upstream Caches

Many problems which are reported by bloggers have simple resolution procedures.
Clear cache in the browser, and restart the browser.
Some problems are slightly more complex.
Clear both cache and cookies, and restart the browser.
and, at the center of each procedure, we see
Clear cache.


Cache, or local storage of Internet content, is at the center of many problems with blogs and web sites. If a copy of your blog is in a cache somewhere, the computers that access the cached copy will continue to display that copy, until told to get a fresh copy. If you just updated your blog, folks accessing the cached copy won't see your changes. One way to ensure that you see fresh copies of everything is to clear cache, which forces fresh retrieval of everything.

For all of its simplicity, clearing cache isn't a universal solution, and neither is it consistently productive - even for problems which are known to generally respond to clearing of cache.

Have you ever noticed that, after you access a new web site, any subsequent visits to that web site seem faster? That's not your imagination, that's your browser using cached content. Caching reduces load time, and it reduces network and server load, by not retrieving directly from a web site, every time you visit that web site. If you clear cache gratuitously, you increase network and server load for everybody, and slow down everybody's Internet experience.

Besides slowing down the Internet for everybody, clearing cache won't consistently solve your problems. If you clear your cache, that ensure that you get a fresh copy of your blog (and other web sites). It has nothing to do with what your readers see. And you can only clear the cache that you control.

Such instructions - to clear cache - cover clearing of cache in the browser, because everybody uses a browser (almost everybody, anyway). Some networks, particularly larger ones, may have a caching proxy server, for both efficiency and security. When you clear your cache in your browser, you won't always think of a local proxy server.

Besides you (or your local network, which you may or may not control) having a caching proxy, there's another possibility. Your ISP may be providing a "Download Accelerator" service. One component of such a service may include a local cache of popular web sites, on your computer, and / or on servers in the ISPs server farm.

If you clear the cache in your browser, and there is an upstream cache on your computer, on your network, or on a server at your ISP, the contents of the upstream cache remains undisturbed. When you request a fresh copy of your blog in your browser, and you just cleared cache in your browser, your browser asks upstream for a copy of the blog. If the blog is in an upstream cache, that's where your browser gets the new copy. Not from the Blogger / Google server.

So if there was a problem with your blog, the problem was just solved by Blogger, and you were instructed to clear cache to ensure that you are able to view your blog with the problem resolved, and if you have an upstream cache, your clearing cache in your browser won't do anything to help.

Here is where, instead of clearing cache, you need to bypass cache temporarily - when you bypass cache, you guarantee a dynamic retrieval from the Blogger / Google server. This is, unfortunately, a temporary measure - unless you explicitly bypass cache each time, until all upstream caches expire, and each cache explicitly requests a fresh copy of the blog.

And here is one of the capricious and random details about web surfing. Every different blogger / blog reader in the world will have a different cache / computer / network infrastructure affecting their surfing activities. And the differences will explain one person responding with
You rock! I'm Following your web site in the future!!
and another
Your advice was useless. Why do you even bother?


>> Top

Atom / RSS Feeds Are Empty

This week, we have a few complaints about Atom / RSS feeds, in various blogs.
When I republish my blogs to my FTP server, the atom.xml and rss.xml files are empty.
or
I published a new post, and feed file size is 0. Tried republishing template/settings and deleting the rss.xml file, but it still publishes with a 0 file size.
or
I recently selected "Publish Entire Blog" from the dashboard settings and now both the rss.xml and atom.xml files are zero bytes. I have tried republishing selected entries and the entire blog again but to no avail, the feeds are still blank.


We also had one very insightful and interesting post.
I see the file here:
http://www.blogger.com/feeds/8073700612434047107/posts/default
but it is at 0 in my FTP here:
http://www.afnews.info/public/afnews/atom.xml
and here
http://www.afnews.info/public/afnews/rss.xml

This observation is very useful. It points out that the problem isn't the feed, it's the involvement of FTP Publishing. I verified the observation - "www.blogger.com/feeds/8073700612434047107/posts/default" isn't empty, though "www.afnews.info/public/afnews/atom.xml" is empty. Other blogs, given the actual blog URL, will help us verify this observation.

If your blog is suffering from this problem, can you please find a thread in Blogger Help Group: Publishing Trouble or Something Is Broken (there are several threads, in each forum, take your pick), and provide details about your problem.
  • What's the URL of the blog? (If the blog has multiple URLs, this could be very important).
  • What's the URL of the problem feed?
  • Is the blog published to BlogSpot, to Google (as a custom domain), or to an external server (using FTP publishing)?
  • Is the feed published only to Blogger / BlogSpot (native Blogger feed), or is it redirected (FeedBurner et al)?
  • When did you first observe the problem?
  • When did you last not observe the problem?
  • If the blog uses FTP publishing, can you look inside each folder below the root, for an unexpected "atom.xml" / "rss.xml" file?
  • If the blog uses FTP publishing, can you please provide all relevant FTP settings?


The blog that you save may be your own, if you can help us out.

(Update 3/28 06:00): It appears that, possibly as part of some changes to Blogger yesterday, this problem has resurfaced.

(Update 3/14 19:00): We are seeing multiple reports that the problem appears to be resolved.
I was able to republish my index earlier this evening and again just now and both files are non-empty.


>> Top

Thursday, March 12, 2009

A Browser For Virginia USA

This month, we see a few interesting complaints
My blog does not open in Internet Explorer but it is working fine in Firefox. And while opening in Internet Explorer, I get the error message "Internet Explorer can not open the webpage"
and
How do I stop from being aborted everytime I view my blog. I assume it's doing this for anyone whom is trying to view it as well.


The details behind these symptoms vary, intriguingly, though they have a common issue.

Many of these reports are from folks using Internet Explorer V6.

Blogger Support sympathises with the folks suffering, but offers some firm advice
We're looking into the underlying cause of this and hope to have a fix out shortly. However, I would strongly encourage those of you still using IE6 to upgrade to a newer browser. IE6 is quickly becoming obsolete across the net.


In this case, I will support the Blogger stand 110%. Blogger has enough of a challenge keeping up with new browsers, and their idiosyncrasies. Expecting them to support a browser 2 versions old is not realistic.

Move into the future, please. The great state of Virginia is doing so, why not you?

>> Top

Wednesday, March 11, 2009

The Google Search Engine Is Not The Only Star In The Sky

Your blog, as it's indexed by the search engines, is like a dandelion. Once you blow on it (and get it indexed by one search engine), it's going to spread all over the yard (the Internet). Picking up the pieces, as in removing your blog from the search engines, is almost an impossible task.

Google provides us with the ability to remove our blogs (web sites) from the Google Search Engine - but the Google Search Engine is not the only search engine with which we should concern ourselves. With the Google Search Engine feeding, and being fed by, other search engines, what's indexed by Google today may be indexed elsewhere tomorrow, and vice versa.

To get an idea how the major search engines feed, and are fed by, each other, take a look at either the Search Engine Partnership Chart, or at the Search Engine Decoder. Both diagrams are animated illustrations, and both use Flash and / or other scripts. If you have Firefox, or another browser that block scripts, you'll have to permit "ihelpyou.com" or "search-this.com", respectively, if you are to get the full picture from the animations.

But check out what's provided - you may be surprised at the complexity - I was.

>> Top

Tuesday, March 10, 2009

Verifying Ownership Of Your Site To Yahoo Site Explorer

As a web master (blog master), besides adding posts and enhancing the template, you have a third activity which is almost as time consuming. You will be constantly connecting your web site (blog) to other web sites and blogs. In many cases, you'll simply send the owners of the other web site (blog) a request to link to your blog.

For links to some web sites, you'll not use email, you'll use an online wizard. To prove ownership of your web site, instead of sending email, you'll add a file of specific name, or maybe specific content, into the web site. You can't add a file to your blog, though, with blogs you have no control over files and folders - all that you do is publish posts.

Yahoo Site Explorer

Similar to Google Webmaster Tools, we have a tool which helps us develop and maintain our relationship between our blogs and the Yahoo search engine spiders. Yahoo Site Explorer helps us develop a sitemap to initially make our blogs more visible to the Yahoo search engines, it provides us with tools to measure our visibility, and it provides us with helpful hints on how to improve our visibility.

You can use Yahoo Site Explorer for any active URL that you administer. If your blog is published to BlogSpot, you use the "xxxxxxx.blogspot.com" URL; if the blog is published to a custom domain or externally using FTP, you use the primary URL for the domain.

Using Yahoo Site Explorer for any web site requires that you are the administrator of the web site. Like Google, Yahoo doesn't want anybody who's not the administrator, of any web site, accessing search engine diagnostics for that web site.

The meta tag provided in the verification process is a token, and it must match the URL that you are verifying. If you change the active URL for the blog (rename it within "blogspot.com", or publish it to another domain), you will need a new verification tag. It is as important a data element as the token that you get in your email (a clickable link) when you're offered membership in a blog, or when you verify an email address, for an account (you click on the link, which opens the token, and applies it to your account).

As with Google Webmaster Tools, you install the token into the blog template, to verify ownership of the domain (blog). Only a blog administrator has the authority to update the template. If you don't install the token into the template, you can't prove that you own the blog, and you can't use Yahoo Site Explorer for your blog.

Elsewhere in Yahoo Site Explorer, you'll find the Web crawl statistics. Some information in the statistics can be very useful to you, while other is informational only. It's to your advantage to separate the two categories.

>> Top

Improved Porn / Spam Blog Reporting For Blogger Blogs

In January 2008, Blogger improved its blog examination process, and started scanning for hacking / porn / spam blogs more intensely. This resulted in a cleaner (though never 100% clean) "Next Blog" surfing environment. Recently, they also improved our ability to actively participate in the cleanup process.

Knowing the possibilities presented, one should also be aware of the limitations.

Monday, March 09, 2009

"Another blog is already hosted at this address" - March 2009

For over a year, many (too many) bloggers report seeing the well known monolithic error
Another blog is already hosted at this address.
when trying to publish their blogs to a Google Custom Domain. In the past, this condition could generally (with a bit of effort, sometimes) be reset by recycling domain settings using various Google Apps wizards. Recently, though, the Google Apps solution has become less effective.
I tried doing all the trouble shooting things and it's still not working.
or
I started to recycle Google Apps, and after several rounds, my www domain started to work, but the naked domain still shows me 404 error. And in "Advanced Settings", I get that naked domain error.


About half the times when Google Apps is not effective, we discover the blog previously published to a URL with mixed case letters. But the mixed case URLs don't seem to be the entire cause of the unrepairable situation. The naked domain error seems to be common in many domains that can't be repaired, too.

For the moment, it appears that the Custom Domain Reset Form will be with us, for a long time.

>> Top

Sunday, March 08, 2009

Schizophrenia And Custom Domain URLs - March 2009

When you setup a Blog*Spot blog, and publish to "myblog.blogspot.com", Blogger automatically defines "www.myblog.blogspot.com" and redirects it for you, to "myblog.blogspot.com". This is a traditional convenience for your readers, and lets them address the blog as either "myblog.blogspot.com" or "www.myblog.blogspot.com". It's not a built in privilege for all web sites, and neither is the ability to address a non BlogSpot blog as either "www.mydomain.com" or "mydomain.com".

A few bloggers don't understand the necessity for the schizophrenic URLs.
My readers only need to use "www.mydomain.com".
or
I don't care about "www.blog.mydomain.com", I only need "blog.mydomain.com" to work.


It's possible that, in a differently designed database, "www.mydomain.com" and "mydomain.com" would be two separate, and distinctly unique addresses, capable of working on their own. But, given the triune possible blog URL pairsMy suspicion is that some of the resilient database corruption seen recently, where the practice of recycling the domain (URL) settings in Google Apps doesn't seem to be 100% effective, may be caused by lack of balanced DNS address definitions.

I strongly suggest that you use a balanced DNS address, and define both the base URL and the "www" alias for that URL, for all custom domain blogs. My suspicion is that lack of DNS addresses for both the base URL and the "www" alias, right now, may later cause you to have to wait for Blogger Support to action yet another entry in the "Magical" Custom Domain Reset form, to save you from the anguish caused by our old friend
Another blog is already hosted at this address.
or
Blogs may not be hosted at naked domains.


Like the auto care commercial used to go
You can pay me now (for preventative maintenance), or pay me later (for a major equipment rebuild).
It's your choice.

>> Top

Saturday, March 07, 2009

Following - How To Not Be Seen

Ever since Blogger launched its Following product, in September 2008, enthusiasm has been ever increasing. Last month, when Blogger Following and Google Friend Connect were integrated, a lot of confusion was generated.
It used to be really easy to become a Follower, I would just click on the "Follow publicly" selection, and that was all there was to it. But lately when I try to Follow, it doesn't end up listing the site I'm Following in my "Blogs I Follow" section on my site, and it doesn't list my blog on my Follower page.


Back in August, when Following was first launched, some of us were concerned about several privacy issues.
Maybe the choice to selectively display some (or all) blogs as Followed, to our other Followed and Followers, or even to the Blogosphere in general, would be good.
We appear to have choices now, in visibility. We can choose To Not Be Seen, in various options. This will mitigate some previously anticipated issues.

If we want to, we can choose to not display any Followed blogs. One of the options in "Edit User Profile" is "Show sites I follow". If we choose to select "Show sites I follow", we can restrict what we show.

I'm going to look at 3 blogs, as examples, and show what can be seen, and what can't be seen.
  1. PChuck's Network. I'm an administrator (owner), member, and I Follow this blog.
  2. Roberto's Report. I'm a member, and I Follow this blog.
  3. t u e s d a y s. I Follow this blog.



My blog Following list. Note that each of the 3 example blogs have a link to a Followers list.



I Follow PChuck's Network anonymously.



I'm an administrator of PChuck's Network. The dashboard entry has a link to the Followers list.



I can see a list of Followers of PChuck's Network, and I can view a list of Blocked Followers.



I Follow Roberto's Report publicly.



I'm a member of Roberto's Report. The dashboard entry has no information about Followers.



My blog Following list shows Roberto's Report, and if I click on the Followers link, I can see a list of active Followers. I have no option to see Blocked Followers.



I Follow t u e s d a y s publicly.



My blog Following list shows t u e s d a y s, but if I click on the Followers link, I can see nothing.



Granularity in displaying what blogs I'm Following.
  1. Follow publicly, and display this site on my profile.
  2. Follow publicly, and do not display this site on my profile.
  3. Follow anonymously, and do not display this site on my profile.


All in all, a good effort in resolving several privacy issues expressed many months back. Bravo, Blogger.

For more information, see Blogger Help: Blogger and Google Friend Connect Privacy FAQ, and Rick Klau's weblog: Blogger Following and Friend Connect.

>> Top

Disappearing Posts - The Mystery Still Continues

This morning, thanks to the latest reported problem with FTP Publishing, I felt the need to write a new post. And having written my new post, I saw yet again another current (and too long well known) problem with Blogger.


This is not good! How do I advise bloggers who want to publish using FTP, if they can't see the blog?


But, I calmed down and realised that this, in itself, wasn't a major problem. This is a new post, so republish the new post. But, neither republishing the post itself, nor publishing a new Draft post (the recommended workaround from Blogger Support), made any difference. The blog remained blank.

Fortunately, I did think to check the individual post, and that was visible with no problem. So, I waited another 5 minutes or so, and eventually the blog main page became visible, without any further action by me.

But wait - - there's more! Later that morning, I wrote this post, published it, and saw the same thing!


This is getting monotonous!



OK, that's better! But, how many times do I have to do this?



And this experience prompts several questions.
  • How many potential readers are seeing a blank blog, when we're not aware it's happening?
  • How many readers are we losing, because this is happening?
  • Why has this problem continued, without being resolved?


>> Top

java.net.NoRouteToHostException: No route to host

A number of bloggers are reporting a new error message, seen when attempting to publish their blog to an external server
java.net.NoRouteToHostException: No route to host


This error is sometimes seen in networking issues in general, and is generally caused by problems like host name or address being incorrect, or maybe a bad DNS server or a bad router. Those are all conditions that lie within Google.

Keeping an open mind, it's possible that the problem may start with something simple, like the Blog URL / FTP Server settings.

Based on the number and variety of reports being published, the problem will probably be resolved by Blogger Support, but getting the problem recognised by them will likely start with help from the bloggers affected identifying the symptom.

If you are experiencing this problem, some basic diagnostic information (whatever you know and can provide) might be useful, to help Blogger Support identify an affinity. You'll find a number of open threads in Blogger Help Group: Publishing Trouble, where your details provided may make a difference.
  • FTP Setting: Blog URL
  • FTP Setting: FTP Server
  • Name of FTP hosting service.
  • Geographic location of FTP hosting service.


(Update 3/8 18:00): Some bloggers have discovered a workaround similar that used for the other currently hot problem. Clear cache, and publish a post as draft.
Cleared cache. Re-set post to draft status and tried again and Bingo! it worked.


>> Top

Friday, March 06, 2009

Not All Web Services Accept Redirected Feeds

This blog is The Real Blogger Status, and it's published to "blogging.nitecruzr.net". The native (classic) Atom newsfeed for this blog has a URL of "blogging.nitecruzr.net/atom.xml". Since I have a FeedBurner feed for this blog, if you click on a feed link in the blog, you should get redirected to the FeedBurner feed, "feeds2.feedburner.com/Nitecruzr-Blogging".

Some services on the Internet, like the Google Sitemap wizard, won't accept a redirected feed like "feeds2.feedburner.com/Nitecruzr-Blogging". For those services, we specify the URL of the native feed, appended with the no redirect modifier, "?redirect=false" or "&redirect=false".

The non redirected (classic) Atom posts feed URL for this blog is, then, "blogging.nitecruzr.net/atom.xml?redirect=false". You can verify these feed URLs in your browser, if you wish.

Here are the standard 5 feed URLs, for the posts feed, published by this blog.
http://blogging.nitecruzr.net/atom.xml
http://blogging.nitecruzr.net/rss.xml
http://blogging.nitecruzr.net/feeds/posts/default
http://blogging.nitecruzr.net/feeds/posts/default?alt=atom
http://blogging.nitecruzr.net/feeds/posts/default?alt=rss
Here are the non redirected 5 feed URLs, for the posts feed, published by this blog.
http://blogging.nitecruzr.net/atom.xml?redirect=false
http://blogging.nitecruzr.net/rss.xml?redirect=false
http://blogging.nitecruzr.net/feeds/posts/default?redirect=false
http://blogging.nitecruzr.net/feeds/posts/default?alt=atom&redirect=false
http://blogging.nitecruzr.net/feeds/posts/default?alt=rss&redirect=false
Comments and label feeds will be similarly modified.

>> Top

Tuesday, March 03, 2009

Disappearing Posts - The Mystery Continues

The problem with disappearing posts - blog posts that display with no content (except the post title - examine the photo below, please) visible, was first reported several weeks ago. Today, I felt the need to update my post about this issue. Having updated the post, I refreshed to test, and poetic justice here, saw a surprise.


OK, enough! How can I help people, if the content which I use to help isn't visible?



And as random as the problem seems to be, you never know if any one of your posts is currently white screened. With any blog of any size, you could have one or more posts white screened at any time, and never know about it.

And with caching latency, some of your readers at any time, might have a fresh copy of your post, provided by Blogger immediately before the problem hit your post. Only those with no copy of the post, or a stale copy of the post, will have to retrieve the problem post. So not all of your readers will see the problem.

And this problem continues, still.

>> Top

Monday, March 02, 2009

Be Careful With The "Edit Posts" PullDown "Label Actions" Menu

I use labels in this blog, a lot. I have a lot of related, overlapping topics in the many posts here, and labels are perfect for mapping the different topics. And I use the "Label Actions" pulldown menu, in "Edit Posts", to add, change, and delete labels on multiple posts. Many other bloggers do too, and some run into interesting problems.
There's an option to "remove" a label, but I couldn't get it to click. My cursor skipped over it. Right below that, there were two choices: Publish and Delete. Since the menu I was in is titled "Label Actions," it seemed logical that "delete' in this case referred to labels. So I hit delete, thinking it would then ask me which labels I wanted to delete. And poof, a message that all my POSTS are gone.


The blogger reporting the problem has subsequently examined the "Label Actions" menu for a second blog, and discovered the same option currently available on that blog too.

In brief, if you see "Delete" and / or "Publish" options in your "Label Actions" menu, don't blindly expect them to affect only labels when used. And if you're really introspective, ask Blogger to add verification, when "Delete" is selected in "Edit Posts".
You have selected to delete nn posts. Do you really want to do this?


>> Top