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Basics: You Cannot Login To My Domain Account

We see evidence of naivete, about responsibilities of Blogger custom domain publishing, in Blogger Help Forum: Get Help with an Issue.
Why does Google not support the blog owners properly, with a telephone number to call, so they can fix domain publishing problems?
Some blog owners don't understand the concept of third party products, and Blogger.

Just as your Blogger (and Google) account is your own property, so is your domain manager account.

The domain account, that your registrar provides to you, is your private access to their dashboard.

Your registrar's dashboard lets you manage your domain. A Blogger custom domain is one, and only one, use for a domain, purchased from a registrar.

We each have our own, personal, domain accounts.

You are not permitted access to my domain account - nor I to yours. Nor does Blogger have the need, nor the legal right, to login to your domain account.

Learn how to work with your registrar.

Your relationship, with your registrar, is yours alone. If your domain has a problem, with a Blogger domain or any other blog or website, it's up to you - working with your registrar - to diagnose and fix the problem.

If you write to Blogger Help Forum: Get Help with an Issue, and ask for help, I'll probably tell you what is wrong - from a Blogger viewpoint. You may have other hosts, besides your Blogger blog, published to your domain - and only you manage those hosts.

Learn how to tell your registrar what is wrong - and what needs to be done.

My having told you what is wrong with your Blogger blog, it's your responsibility to contact a customer service technician at your registrar, tell them what is wrong, tell them what needs to be done, and convince them to fix the problem as you require.

Alternately, you may use your domain account to login to the registrars dashboard, access the zone editor, and fix the problem. It's your domain - and you choose the resolution.

Learn how to access and use the registrar's zone editor.

If you elect to fix the problem yourself, remember the two details about registrar dashboards and zone editors.

  1. It's your responsibility to find out how to access the zone editor.
  2. It's your responsibility to find out how to use the zone editor.

Every different registrar has different name servers, to distribute the addresses of the domains that they support (including yours) - and every different registrar has a different zone editor, and its own syntax.

If you work with me, and get to the point where you cannot see what to do next, I'll work with you. If you need help accessing and using the zone editor, I'll try to help you.

Alternately, learn how to access the zone editor - and how to make screen prints.

In the latter case, you'll still have to have personal access to the zone editor - and you'll need to make and post screen prints. If you use screen prints, please learn how to produce and provide screen prints properly, so they are useful.

It's to your advantage, to get your domain working properly.

When you buy a custom domain, you want to get the domain working, so you can publish the blog - and so you can publish the blog, with its new valuable URL. Time spent with you making screen prints - and me showing you what the registrar technician did, instead of what is needed - is not time well spent.

Learn how to access and use the zone editor, or how to manage the relationship with the registrar, and spend your time wisely. Get your domain working, and get your domain active.

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