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Two Level Comments, And One Known Post Template Update

From feedback being received about the recent release of two level commenting, and the many different problems attributed to the release, it appears that there is one commonly identified update to the post template. It's possible that adding this one change, to some blogs with tweaked post templates, may eliminate the need for a post template refresh.

This is a simple change - but it must be made in 4 different places. I highly recommend that you backup the template, before and after making this change. Allow 30 minutes, to concentrate properly on the task.

Installation of this one post template patch may eliminate the need for many people to refresh the post template. It's also possible that this change, done in reverse, may let you disable two level comments, should you wish. In either case, please do this carefully, when you are relaxed, and able to concentrate.
  1. First, backup the template.
  2. Edit the template using the "Edit HTML" wizard, and select "Expand Widget Templates".
  3. Carefully search for each instance of
    <b:include data='post' name='comments'/>
  4. Note that the target snippet (above) is entirely contained in the replace snippet (below). When you identify each snippet found, carefully examine it to make sure that the required code is not already present! Do not replace the target snippet with itself, redundantly!
  5. Replace each instance found, if not already present, with
    <b:if cond='data:post.showThreadedComments'>
      <b:include data='post' name='threaded_comments'/>
    <b:else/>
      <b:include data='post' name='comments'/>
    </b:if>
  6. Save Template.
  7. Clear browser cache, and restart the browser. Test your changes.
  8. Again, backup the template.

Again, I'll advise you to backup the template, before and after doing this.

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Comments

Nance said…
Before I tackle this fix, I notice that threaded comments work perfectly well with my two .blogspot blogs, but do not work with my custom domain blog (purchased through Google).

Blog: www.maturelandscaping.com.
Jean said…
Before I tackle this, I'd like to know I won't be opening another can of worms!
Faizal Rahman said…
Wondering why you did not use threaded reply?
Chuck Croll said…
Thanks Faizal, you ask a good question.

Many of the people who read this blog, and who benefit from my advice, are using browsers and computers with overly optimistic filtering.

Threaded commenting requires use of the embedded comment form, which is susceptible to cookie filtering problems, caused by layered security settings on peoples computers.

In order to enable more people to comment on this blog, I'm going to avoid use of the embedded comment form.

http://blogging.nitecruzr.net/2011/06/cookie-filtering-and-commenting-ability.html

http://blogging.nitecruzr.net/2011/01/technical-sophistication-of-your-blogs.html
Seh Wei Jun said…
Finally, a real fix for this one. Thanks a lot buddy <3

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