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Legacy Blogger Accounts Are No Longer Supported

Last year, Blogger made an announcement that displeased a few Blogger blog owners.
For a number of technical and operational reasons, we’ve decided to finally end our support for migrating legacy accounts and blogs after December 5, 2011.
The initial announcement was made in April, 2011, with an action date, initially scheduled, well before December 5 - and the action date was delayed, several times. The quotation that you see was edited by Blogger Support, in their article, repeatedly.

On December 6, 2011, support for Legacy Blogger accounts finally ended. Even so, we still see occasional signs of oblivious account holders, in Blogger Help Forum: Something Is Broken.
My account doesn't have a Google address because it it is 8 years old - how do I recover access to my account?
Apparently, not everybody who needed to do so, bothered to read the announcement.

Like the long announced FTP Publishing migration, Legacy accounts support has ended. There's no known alternative, for Legacy accounts - nor is the status of the accounts themselves - or the blogs, or of the URLs, owned by the non supported Blogger accounts - known.

What does the above announcement state? Simply, if
  1. You have a legacy account.
  2. You never bothered to migrate your legacy account.
  3. You try migrating your legacy account in the future.
  4. And you have a problem with the migration.
  5. Then, you are on your own.
Blogger is looking to the future - and needs to spend their time more productively. They simply don't have time to diagnose problems with individual accounts that can't be migrated, after many months of warning, about this change, was provided.

What does the above announcement not state?
  1. You can't use your legacy Blogger account, in the future.
  2. You can't migrate your legacy Blogger account, to a current Google account.
  3. Your legacy Blogger account will be deleted.
  4. Your blogs, owned by a legacy Blogger account, will be deleted.
  5. The URLs, used by blogs owned by a legacy Blogger account, will be taken from you.
  6. Any URL, used by a blog owned by a legacy Blogger account, will be made available to you.
None of the above were stated, in the announcement. The announcement states only that migration support has ended. Whether any of the above will change, in the future, can't be predicted. We'll hope that some warning will be given, before any of the above change. Just don't bet any money that warning will be given.

All that we can say, right now, is
You were warned.
Sorry. All things come to an end. You have to support Blogger, to expect them to support you.

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Comments

thanku so much for blog..
Thank you so much. How do I know if I have a legacy account and what do you mean "If you don't support Blogger, Blogger won't support you". Aren't we supporting Blogger by using it? How do we support Blogger? Thanks again.
Chuck Croll said…
Socorro,

All that I'm doing is warning everybody to not idly forget their login information, and expect to just talk to a real person, explain the situation, and have Blogger Support blindly tell them

"You need to login to your blog, using 'xxxxxxx @ yyy . zzz".

Since we are permitted to publish our blogs anonymously, and since our Blogger accounts and blogs never expire, Blogger can't break anonymity, and tell us everything we need to know.

http://groups.google.com/a/googleproductforums.com/forum/?hl=en&fromgroups#!category-topic/blogger/Dd8NutfAuJQ

http://blogging.nitecruzr.net/2009/06/you-are-responsible-for-maintaining.html

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