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Blog Owners Unable To Stay Logged In, To Edit Or Post To Their Blogs

A persistent complaint, seen periodically in Blogger Help Forum: Something Is Broken is
I can't stay logged in to my blog!
Like many symptoms of Blogger login problems, this complaint can have multiple causes.

Like problems with posting comments to blogs with embedded comment forms, login state is retained locally, on the computers used by the blog owners. If you block third party cookies, or if you clear cookies inappropriately, you'll have problems with "staying logged in".

People with multiple Blogger accounts may, likewise, have this symptom. Blogger won't ever tell you what Blogger account is required to access a given blog - it will simply tell you when you are logged in using the right Blogger account. If you're logged in using an account that does not own the blog displayed, you should expect to see the Dashboard link - and no more - in your navbar "blog owner" section.

Like all problems with authentication / login issues, you'll need to diagnose this symptom objectively. If possible, the easiest way to start is to extract the Profile ID of the owner of the blog, and compare that with the Profile ID of the person reporting the problem. If the two Profile IDs match, then instruct the person reporting the problem to test for a cookie filtering problem. If neither test is conclusive, consider the possibility of compound problems - possibly another layered security issue.

You may also find a more comprehensive analysis of the problem.

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