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Proactive Content Removal Helps Avoid Problems

We occasionally see a confused content thief / spammer, unsure why the blog was deleted.
I removed all of the content that I was told to remove. Why was my blog deleted?
or
Why was my blog restored, then deleted the following week?
Some blog owners do not understand the consequences of repeated review.

The more times your blog is reviewed, the more completely and carefully the content will be examined.

Any dodgy or unacceptable material, that was passed in an automated review (or first manual review) last week, is less likely to be passed, in this week's second (or third) review.

Repeated review leads to more carefully conducted review.

The more times your blog is reviewed - whether the review is needed because the blog failed review last week - or because the blog passed review, was restored, then deleted again this week - the more carefully Blogger will conduct this week's review.

If you're able, remove anything that's even possibly a problem.

If your blog was restored, the first thing that you should do is examine the content very closely, and remove anything remotely abusive or illegal. If the blog needs review again, you'll want to have less content, that might cause any problems.

Remember, Blogger won't keep deleting and restoring your blog, over and over. After enough reviews, they will delete your Blogger account, treating you as a non repentant abuser.

If your Blogger account gets deleted or locked, your problems become worse.

With a deleted / locked Blogger account, you'll have more problems.
  1. Any other blogs that you author (even team owned blogs) will go offline.
  2. If your account is locked, you won't be able to request review of any blogs.
  3. If your account is deleted, any associated resources (pictures, videos, and such) will go offline. Restored accounts may not restore resources, properly.
If all of this seems unfair, you may be right.

Take action now, if you can.

If the blog was just restored, and you now have control, you need to take action.
  1. Remove existing offending content.
  2. Appeal the violation (if possible).
  3. Stop adding offending content.

Blind content removal requires that all potentially offending material - not just the specific content generating the complaint - be removed. No guidance is given, as to what material must be removed - though you should peruse Blogger Content, and Google TOS, documents.

Incomplete removal, or addition of offensive content, will subject you to more severe punishment.

Don't push the limits. Quit while you're ahead (or even).

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