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Getting In To The New Post Editor, And Designer Templates, Carefully

There are different ways to get into a properly designed swimming pool. Most pools have a shallow end, possibly with steps - and a hand rail. Cautious people like to walk down the steps, slowly, holding on to the rail. At the other end, where it is deep, some folks like to dive (head first), or jump (feet first), and go in quickly.

Summer is just around the corner - in the USA anyway. Some pools, that are not heated, you may not enjoy using for a couple more months. If you dive in to an unheated pool, you may not enjoy the feeling (you may not have any feeling in your body). Use the steps, or hop in to the shallow end, if you're experienced in early summer swimming.

If you've been reading about my experiences with the new post editor, and about the new designer templates, you may wonder about how to get into that swimming pool. The water isn't very clear, and you may not know how deep it is anywhere. And, it's a good idea to know where the steps are, so you can get out quickly if you find that it's too cold.

But, if you are daring, you are still welcome to dive right in - just only use the deep end for diving. This Blogger swimming pool has a number of options - so be aware of the options, and pick the right end. And always stay aware of the depth of the water, wherever you are in the pool.

If you want to get in to this pool slowly, you'll want to setup a second Blogger account - and use new post editor, and Draft (blue) Blogger, from the new account. As with all plans to use two different Blogger accounts, you'll probably enjoy this more if you use two different browsers, or two different computers.

There are several strategies for testing designer templates and / or new post editor.
  • Walk in slowly, using the steps. Setup a separate Blogger account for using the features, and setup separate blogs under the new account.
  • Hop in to the shallow end. Setup a separate Blogger account for using the new features, and make both your current and new accounts team members of your various blogs.
  • Dive right in. Convert your existing account to new post editor, and to Draft Blogger.

If you want to experiment carefully, you'll try Draft features, or the new post editor, alternately with current features. You'll want two accounts administering one blog, so create the blog under one account - then make the second account an author, then a second administrator.

When you have two or more blog members, you'll have a team blog. With a team blog, the default Profile gadget in the blogs will change to an "About Us" gadget - so you may want to make a custom Profile gadget, if you don't care to make the existence of your second Blogger account obvious.

Just don't forget about why you got into the pool, in the first place. Do some swimming.

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Comments

teddytrump said…
Hey, nice philosophy :) I did it too like you posted above

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