Skip to main content

Legacy Account Migration Is Less Likely, Each Year

In 2012, Blogger ended support for legacy accounts.

This year, we see that account recovery does not support legacy accounts, any more. People who don't remember their legacy account names / passwords are now unable to migrate - and are unable to recover account access, so they can migrate.

Every year, any account which remains unmigrated is less likely to be accessible, by the owner. As that happens, and with account recovery not working for legacy accounts, migration won't be possible - and the account will be unusable.

For many blog owners with unmigrated accounts, legacy account migration is simply not possible.

Migration may not be technically possible.
Thanks to a combination of account identity confusion, and plain old forgetfulness causing inability to remember necessary details, successful migration is unlikely.

Add to those issues the general confusion about which accounts require migration - and we see the wisdom in Blogger dropping support for migration, in 2012.

If you need to migrate now, you may have waited too long.
If you have a dormant Blogger account, which may or may not be in need of migration, and you now see the need to migrate but can't, we feel for you - really. However, your inability to migrate now is a direct result of your inattentiveness 2010 - 2015.

You should have migrated, by 2012. You ignored the repeated warnings - or maybe did not receive warnings, because of intentional or un intentional anonymity - and 3 years after migration support was ended, you are finally seeing the handwriting on the wall.

Unfortunately, it's simply too late. For some, 2012 may have been too late - and now, in 2015, it's too late for too many.

Some may manage to migrate, with enough effort - others may not need to do so.
It's possible that some folks may be able to recover / remember the necessary details, given enough time researching. And others won't need to migrate - though they may not realise that detail.

And too many simply won't be able to migrate.
If you do have a legacy account, yet unmigrated, you may want to consider an alternative policy. Time is not on your side - and it may simply be a waste of your time and money, to attempt migration.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

What's The URL Of My Blog?

We see the plea for help, periodicallyI need the URL of my blog, so I can give it to my friends. Help!Who's buried in Grant's Tomb, after all?No Chuck, be polite.OK, OK. The title of this blog is "The Real Blogger Status", and the title of this post is "What's The URL Of My Blog?".

Leave Comments Here

Like any blogger, I appreciate polite comments, when they are relevant to the blog, and posted to the relevant article in the right blog. If you want to ask me a question thats relevant to blogging, but you can't find the right post to start with (I haven't written about everything blogger related, yet, nor the way things are going I don't expect to either), ask your questions here, or leave an entry in my guestbook.

As noted above, please note my commenting policy. If you post a comment to this post, I will probably treat it as a "Contact Me" post. If you have an issue that's relevant to any technical issue in the blog, please leave a comment on the specific post, not here. This post is for general comments, and for non posted contact to me.

If the form below does not work for you, check your third party cookies setting!

For actual technical issues, note that peer support in Blogger Help Forum: Something Is Broken, or Nitecruzr Dot Net - Blogging is, almos…

What Is "ghs.google.com" vs. "ghs.googlehosted.com"?

With Google Domains registered custom domains becoming more normal, we are seeing one odd attention to detail, expressed as confusion in Blogger Help Forum: Learn More About Blogger.My website uses "ghs.google.com" - am I supposed to use "ghs.googlehosted.com", instead?It's good to be attentive to detail, particularly with custom domain publishing. This is one detail that may not require immediate attention, however.