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Team Blog Recovery To Authors, With Cached Access

The "Forgot?" blog control recovery wizard is sensitive to team blogs - and to the access level owned by the existing members in the team blogs.

If the team has only one administrator, that one administrator cannot delete or demote himself, using the dashboard Permissions wizard. If the one administrator deletes his Blogger / Google account, on the other hand, a team blog is left with no administrator. You can't have a blog for long, without an administrator.

So when a team blog member requests recovery, "Forgot?" checks the team blog members - and if no administrator is found, sends recovery email to all of the authors.

Sometimes, when a team of blog authors try to recover control of their blog, some of them discover a disappointing problem.
I recovered access - but when I signed back in, I was still just an author!
The blog still lacks an administrator. How could this happen?

Existing author access may prevent promotion to administrator.

In some cases, when re "joining" a team blog, an author may re join the blog - with the cookie, which defines him as an author, still in effect. The existence of this cookie then prevents his promotion to administrator.

If all of the authors, able to receive and accept recovery, are subject to this cookie status limitation, nobody gets promoted - and the blog still lacks an administrator.

The exact cause of this problem is not obvious - but the contributing factor, by the authors, is their need to recover control using the same Blogger account. The author status cookie should be effective only for the account which had author status.

The team members have 2 choices.
  • Clear cache, cookies, and sessions, before accepting control.
  • Accept control, using a different Blogger account.

Clear cache, cookies, and sessions, before accepting control.

If an author has promotion blocked by an existing author status cookie, this will not happen if a cookie does not exist. Clear cache, cookies, and sessions, restart the browser, and accept the recovery token again.

With no existing cookie, the recovery token should take effect - and the former author becomes an administrator.

Accept control, using a different Blogger account.

If a former author (under the current Blogger account) accepts control recovery using a different account, the recovery token should take effect - and the former author becomes an administrator.

If necessary, create a new Blogger account.

This will probably require a second use of "Forgot?", and email Inbox visit.

In either case, the authors will probably need new recovery tokens. Once opened, a token can't be reused - so you'll need new tokens. That's just 10 minutes of duplicated effort. And, if the second attempt is successful, that's time well spent.

If recovering control involves one or more remaining administrators, no promotion.

If the team still has an administrator, "Forgot?" is not going to send promotion tokens to the authors. The remaining administrators still retain control.

If the remaining administrators are inactive, the blog simply has no active administrators. "Forgot?" cannot always determine activity status. This is one more reason why trimming the administrator list is a necessity - not merely a slack time activity.

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