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Removing Surplus Administrators Is Not A Formality

In the Blogger distant past, there was always the possibility that some blog owner would, in the process of cleaning up the complement of blog administrators in Permissions, manage to remove herself (himself) from the list.

If the blog owner was, as in many cases, the only administrator, you'd soon see his (her) post
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in Blogger Help Forum: Get Help with an Issue.

Sometime later, Blogger fixed that design flaw, and made the Permissions wizard check the list before removing any selected administrator. Now, any account that is the sole administrator cannot be removed from administrator status. There will always be at least one administrator, for any blog.

Even with the latter ownership requirement, some blog owners still manage to lock themselves out of the house.

Leaving the old administrator, as a backup, may be instinctive.

In the process of changing from one administrator to another (as in transfer of control), there is occasionally the temptation to leave the old administrator in place, as a backup. With the old administrator in place as a backup, occasionally someone may lose track of his senses, and remove her (his) current (newly assigned) account from the list.

But you must ensure that the "backup" will function as a backup.

If the old administrator is now non functional (as will happen with unused accounts), the blog is now left with merely one non functional administrator account. And, nothing to do but post
Help!
in Blogger Help Forum: Get Help with an Issue.

Blogs may simply disappear, from team dashboards.

In some cases, blogs owned in team relationships may disappear from the dashboards of all team members.

Removing the old address - and surplus members - may seem like a formality, but here we see that it's more than that. It's a necessary safety strategy. You really want to avoid ending up with no access, to your blog.

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