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Custom Domain Publishing And Private Blogs

We see an occasional report in Blogger Help Forum: Get Help with an Issue, about custom domain publishing.
My readers can't view the blog - they get a redirection count error!

DNS analysis shows a properly setup domain. When we try to examine the blog, we see a private blog notice - or we are required to login.

But why a private blog, using a custom domain?

The purpose of publishing to a custom domain is to increase readership - by making a blog more visible, using a non BlogSpot URL.

A private blog has limited readership, based on permissions provided by the owner. The need to make a blog private conflicts with the need to increase reader population.

Besides the functional conflict, there's a second problem with combining a custom domain published blog, and access by invitation. Both the custom domain redirection, and the private blog redirection involve interstitial code.


This is a private blog. Combine this, and a custom domain redirection - and you get trouble.



A potential blog reader, when accessing the blog by the BlogSpot URL, will redirect to the domain URL - and then to the access checking interstitial. Some browsers will interpret this as a possible security issue, and cite

Too many redirections!

In other cases, the two redirections may lead to a redirect loop - and the reader will see a white screen of death.

What ever the result - "Too many redirections", or a redirect loop, the potential reader will never see the blog.

If you want to publish a blog, and limit reader access by invitation, you're better off publishing to BlogSpot. If you want to use a non BlogSpot URL, a public blog makes sense.



You are allowed to publish a #Blogger blog with a designated reader population - and you're allowed to publish a blog to a non BlogSPot URL.

You can publish a private blog to a custom domain, if you wish - but this is not recommended. Learn why combining limited access with a non BlogSpot URL is not a good idea.

https://productforums.google.com/forum/#!category-topic/blogger/5IUByvxKYeg

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