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Country Code Aliasing Is A Solution - Not A Problem

Blogger recently expanded a key feature in their infrastructure - country code aliasing.

Like all Blogger features, every time they expand the scope of aliasing, they cause problems. Some of the problems that were caused by the recent expansion of country code aliasing - where they added over 2 dozen countries, in one project - are damaging vulnerable Blogger blogs.

Incidental damage to any blogs, however, should not justify stopping - or impeding - the implementation of redirections, on a worldwide basis.

There are real benefits, to country code alias redirection.

All Blogger blogs may offend somebody, somewhere.

All Blogger blog owners benefit, as country specific domains become common, in the Blogger infrastructure. Every blog, with any interesting content, has the potential to irritate somebody, somewhere in the world.

If your blog were to offend a key government official, in a key Blogger market, to the condition where he gave the ultimatum.
Either that blog goes - or Blogger service goes, in this country!
Which alternative do you think Blogger Management would choose?

If an important government official is offended, your blog could be deleted.

The question
Will Blogger give your blog the axe?
would be more relevantly put as
When Blogger gives your blog the axe, will they give you any warning, so you can save content?
And my suspicion is that they would pull the plug immediately. Then, you will be left to retrieve content from cache, as you're able.

Your blog will be much better off, with an offended government official getting a properly issued court order, and having your blog (just your blog) blocked in her country (just her country).

It's better to have a blog blocked in one country, than deleted.

There are 196 countries in the world, as of right now - and over 50 are subject to alias redirection, under Blogger. Almost any blog owner would gladly settle for having her (his) blog available, in 195 countries, than 0 countries.

Country code aliasing is a righteous feature.

The country code aliasing rollout is a righteous project - no matter how many blogs get incidentally damaged, in an individual country. Please, don't stand in the way, using dodgy workarounds.

And if you must stand in the way, and you later decide to publish to a custom domain, remember to remove your dodgy script - if you don't suffer righteous malware classification, before then.

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