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Diverse And Large Blogs Require More Effort

An interesting attitude is seen, from some owners of large and unfocused blogs.
It's normal, with so many articles in a blog, to have some reports (DMCA / TOS complaints).
It's normal, yes. That does not make it acceptable - or beneficial. If you want to publish a large blog - and make lots of money - you have to focus or limit your efforts.

You need to spend as much time - if not more time - reviewing content for legality, than owners of comparable, smaller blogs. You can't take time away from reviewing, to create and publish more content - then justify your failure to stay within the limits, by implying that it's normal to have posts that push the limits.

With a large blog, you need to spend more time reviewing what you are publishing.

The larger a blog becomes, the more time you need, to keep the content focused. And the more time you need, to ensure all content is legal.
Crapola. Content of poor quality, low / vague / zero relevance to the subject of the blog, and / or blogs with cloned / copied / scraped content.
You don't want to see that verdict, when you request review - not that you want to have to request review, either.

A large blog requires more of your time, proportionally, than a smaller blog, for reviewing content. And content review is more important - because when the blog is classified as abusive, it will take longer for the blog to be reviewed, by Google staff.

The larger your blog becomes, the more effort is necessary, to keep it within the limits.
  • A larger blog will be more important to you.
  • A larger blog will require more effort by you, to keep the content focused.
  • A larger blog will require more effort by you, to keep the content legal.
  • A larger blog will take longer to be reviewed by Blogger.

A larger blog will be more important to you.
The larger the blog, the more traffic it will generate - and the more money it will make. And the more distressing it will be, to you, to have it taken offline, by Blogger.

A larger blog will require more effort by you, to keep the content focused.
Every post that you write - if you're not writing an encyclopedia - may contain material that is not relevant to the blog. More posts = more time spent by you, verifying that each post is consistent with the blog subject.

Subject drift is a normal human problem - but it can become your problem, if your blog is classified as crapola.

A larger blog will require more effort by you, to keep the content legal.
Every post that you write - if you don't write complete fiction - may infringe upon somebody else's copyright. More posts = more time spent by you, carefully checking each post for uniqueness.

Copying other peoples content is a normal human mistake - but it can become your mistake, if your blog is classified as scraping.

A larger blog will take longer to be reviewed by Blogger.
The larger your blog, the more effort required by Blogger Review staff, to review it for crapola or scraping. And the larger it becomes, the more chance it may be pushed backwards in the review queue, by reviewers who prefer to review many smaller blogs, instead of one larger blog.

It's your blog - and you set the standards for publishing.
You're allowed to do what pleases you, with your blog. If you have readers, though, you should spend some time thinking about what they are looking for - including, presumably, a blog that remains online, so they can read it when convenient.

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