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Static Pages, And Duplication Prevention Suffixing

Sometimes, after we publish a static page or a post, we may need to start over. When starting over, the natural tendency is to delete the page or the post being edited, and make a clean start. With blogs, where we control only the page or post title, this is not always a good idea.

With static pages, as with posts, once you publish a page with a given title, the URL that's relevant to the title is locked to that page. If you delete a page that's been published with a given title, and simply start over with a new page with the same title, the new page will have a suffixed URL.

Right now, when you rename your blog - and change the blog URL - the Pages index won't be automatically updated. Clicking on a Pages link will give us an old friend
404 Not Found
or the Blogger equivalent
Page not found
Sorry, the page you were looking for in the blog The Real Blogger Status does not exist.
Some bloggers will panic, and delete the pages already published.

This is the wrong reaction, as the URLs for those pages were updated when the blog was renamed. The Pages gadget was not updated, and the pages URLs are locked to the published pages. If you delete then re publish your pages, the newly published pages will all have suffixed URLs.

The proper procedure is to delete then re add the Pages gadget, or to manually update any custom labels / pages / posts index.

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Comments

Dudel said…
This is only for already posted posts and pages, correct? Meaning anything scheduled or a draft isn't counted and is okay to delete and start from scratch without causing an issue.

Yes?
Interesting!you are absolutely correct.
Chuck said…
Dudel,

The URL is created when the post is published, so yes, this applies to published pages and posts. This is a problem with imported content - importing causes different URLs, thanks to suffixing.
Dudel said…
Alright cool. Just double checking, ya know?
Jean said…
After I edited my About page, when I click on that page I get the notice "Sorry, the page you were looking for in this blog does not exist." The same thing happened with a different page a few months ago, I ended up figuring out how to fix it, but now I can't remember what I did!

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