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Firefox V3 and Cookies

Cookies have been a recognised security hazard for several years, for many security experts. Firefox Version 3 takes cookies very seriously, and expects you to do likewise.

If you've upgraded to Firefox Version 3 recently, you may have noted problems when logging in to Blogger, or running scripts like CAPTCHA based verification for comment entry. Under Tools - Options - Privacy, you'll find a selection to "Accept third-party cookies". The Blogger login process uses cookies from Google and / or GMail ("mail.google.com" / "gmail.com") to allow you access to your Blogger account. CAPTCHA scripts check to see if you are the owner of the blog, so you, the owner of your blog, don't have to enter a CAPTCHA when posting comments to your blog.

If you don't enable third party cookies, you'll likely see mysterious messages about JavaScript not being enabled, you may have to login repeatedly (even though you selected "Remember me"), or the essential CAPTCHA simply won't show an image.

Enable "Accept third-party cookies", and you'll do fine. Another case of excessive or mysterious security, and you should get used to it.

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Comments

Kim said…
Thank you so much! This solved a very frustrating problem I was having staying logged in to Blogger and I can now also comment on blogs I was not able to before types that use a comment box like yours)! I must've unchecked that third party cookies box at some point. Not keen on having more cookies on my computer, but happy to have full access to everything like before. Thanks again!
Joel said…
In Firefox 3.5, I leave "Accept third-party cookies" unchecked and then go into the Exceptions button and put in domains as allow. Adding blogger.com to seems to have fixed commenting for me. Not sure if this an acceptable fix or not.

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