Skip to main content

Custom Domains and Case Significance in the URLs

This blog is "blogging.nitecruzr.net".

If I wanted to dress it up a bit, I might tell you it's "Blogging.Nitecruzr.Net". Either URL should work, equally well.

That's not the case with all blogs, today. Here's an example - "mydomain.com". A normal DNS configuration, per an excerpted Dig log.

MyDomain.com. 3600 IN A 216.239.32.21
MyDomain.com. 3600 IN A 216.239.34.21
MyDomain.com. 3600 IN A 216.239.36.21
MyDomain.com. 3600 IN A 216.239.38.21
www.MyDomain.com. 3600 IN CNAME ghs.google.com.
---
ghs.google.com. 32316 IN CNAME ghs.l.google.com.
ghs.l.google.com. 300 IN A 74.125.43.121


The HTTP traces are rather unique.

First, look at "mydomain.blogspot.com", in 2 variations. Look carefully at the URLs - the upper case letters aren't decorative.

GET / HTTP/1.1
Host: mydomain.blogspot.com
User-Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 5.1; en-US; rv:1.9.0.6) Gecko/2009011913 Firefox/3.0.6
Connection: close

• Finding host IP address...
• Host IP address = 209.85.133.191
• Finding TCP protocol...
• Binding to local socket...
• Connecting to host...
• Sending request...
• Waiting for response...
Receiving Header:
HTTP/1.1·301·Moved·Permanently(CR)(LF)
Location:·http://www.MyDomain.com/(CR)(LF)

Sending request:

GET / HTTP/1.1
Host: www.MyDomain.com
User-Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 5.1; en-US; rv:1.9.0.6) Gecko/2009011913 Firefox/3.0.6
Connection: close

• Finding host IP address...
• Host IP address = 209.85.171.121
• Finding TCP protocol...
• Binding to local socket...
• Connecting to host...
• Sending request...
• Waiting for response...
Receiving Header:
HTTP/1.1·200·OK(CR)(LF)

...

<link·rel="alternate"·type="application/atom+xml"·title="My·Blog·-·Atom"
·href="http://www.MyDomain.com/feeds/posts/default"·/>(LF)
<link·rel="alternate"·type="application/rss+xml"·title="My·Blog·-·RSS"
·href="http://www.MyDomain.com/feeds/posts/default?alt=rss"·/>(LF)

Apparently published to "www.MyDomain.com", from seeing the feed URLs. There's a variation of this result. See if you can spot the difference.

GET / HTTP/1.1
Host: mydomain.blogspot.com
User-Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 5.1; en-US; rv:1.9.0.6) Gecko/2009011913 Firefox/3.0.6
Connection: close

• Finding host IP address...
• Host IP address = 74.125.19.191
• Finding TCP protocol...
• Binding to local socket...
• Connecting to host...
• Sending request...
• Waiting for response...

Receiving Header:
HTTP/1.1·200·OK(CR)(LF)

...

<link·rel="alternate"·type="application/atom+xml"·title="My·Blog·-·Atom"
·href="http://www.MyDomain.com/feeds/posts/default"·/>(LF)
<link·rel="alternate"·type="application/rss+xml"·title="My·Blog·-·RSS"
·href="http://www.MyDomain.com/feeds/posts/default?alt=rss"·/>(LF)


The first trace is what you see after transition period has expired, and the blog is explicitly published to the custom domain URL. The second trace is what you see during the transition period, with the blog published to the domain URL (see the feed URL?), but without a "301 Moved Permanently" redirect in place.

OK, so far. How about "www.mydomain.com"?

Sending request:

GET / HTTP/1.1
Host: www.mydomain.com
User-Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 5.1; en-US;
rv:1.9.0.6) Gecko/2009011913 Firefox/3.0.6
Connection: close

• Finding host IP address...
• Host IP address = 209.85.171.121
• Finding TCP protocol...
• Binding to local socket...
• Connecting to host...
• Sending request...
• Waiting for response...
Receiving Header:
HTTP/1.1·404·Not·Found(CR)(LF)


And here's what you get, when accessing the blog. Look closely at the URL, in the address window. "mydomain.blogspot.com" --> "www.mydomain.com", which can't be found, since the blog was published to "www.MyDomain.com".



D'ohh.

Maybe publishing your blog, using mixed case in the name, isn't a good idea.

This looks like a case of case observation / case preservation gone wrong.

In this case, my advice would be given as
Publish the blog back to BlogSpot, then re publish it to "www.mydomain.com".

http://blogging.nitecruzr.net/2007/11/custom-domain-publishing-and-404-error.html
And hope like heck to not see
Another blog is already hosted at this address.


If you do see the latter error, recycle the domain settings in Google Apps, persistently. Then re publish to the "www" alias again.

Comments

Sree said…
Thank you! Apparently, the caps in my custom URL messed everything up--but with your advice, I was able to fix it :) I wish Blogger told people upfront not to put capital letters in their custom URLs.
CherylK said…
I agree with Sree. Did the same thing. I posted my problem in the Blogger forum just now but should have commented here, I think. Did I need to buy a new custom domain, again, only with the lower case letters? I clicked on "Switch to Advance Settings" since I've already purchased the domain (www.MauiWowiMN.com) but entered it with all lower case. I still got the message "url not found". I guess I'm still confused.
CherylK said…
I just posted a comment a couple of minutes ago lamenting the fact that I was still getting the "url not found" message. Well, I've tried again and it's now working!!

Thank you so much for your help. I agree with Sree that Blogger needs to advise people to not put caps in their custom URLs!
Chuck said…
Tell them - or edit the URL properly - I'd settle for either. I've told them this, a few times.
thank you so much! It work very well. I just finished change my domain to all small caps and it work perfect.
Joyce said…
Thank you sooooo much. I was researching online about my custom domain issues and you were the only one that fixed my problem!
Chankey Pathak said…
Never imagined that domain names are case sensitive.

Popular posts from this blog

Custom Domain Migration - Managing The Traffic

Your blog depends upon traffic for its success.

Anything that affects the traffic to your blog, such as any change in the URL, affects the success of your blog. Publishing the blog to a custom domain, like renaming the blog, will affect traffic to your blog. The effects of the change will vary from blog to blog, because of the different traffic to every different blog.Followers. People who find your blog because of recommendations by other people.Search engines. Robotic processes which methodically surf your blog, and provide dynamic indexing to people who search for information.Subscribers. People who read your content from their newsfeed reader, such as the dashboard Reading List.Viewers. People who read your content from their browser.No two blogs are the same - and no two blogs will have the same combinations of traffic sources.

Stats Components Are Significant, In Their Own Context

One popular Stats related accessory, which displays pageview information to the public, is the "Popular Posts" gadget.

Popular Posts identifies from 1 to 10 of the most popular posts in the blog, by comparing Stats pageview counts. Optional parts of the display of each post are a snippet of text, and an ever popular thumbnail photo.

Like many Stats features, blog owners have found imaginative uses for "Popular Posts" - and overlook the limitations of the gadget. Both the dynamic nature of Stats, and the timing of the various pageview count recalculations, create confusion, when Popular Posts is examined.