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A T & T DNS Hosting Validating "A" / "CNAME" Target Using Ping?

In an extremely odd case this week, we have one blogger who is setting up a custom domain, and upon entering what should be a valid CNAME, is advised
The CNAME entry that you are trying to use failed because it is does not have a valid A record. In other words when you try to ping ghs.google.com it does not directly return any pings or an IP address. It will when it has been translated or resolved from the actual name ghs.l.google.com. The name ghs.l.google.com returns pings and has a valid A record. You may want to try to use this name instead.

From reading this report, it appears that the A T & T DNS Hosting Setup wizard is attempting to validate DNS setup based upon ping response. This is an incorrect screening technique.
  • False Negatives. Many DNS servers won't reply to pings.
    • Ping traffic has low priority in some networks.
    • Other networks may deliberately block or drop ping traffic, as it's used in some hacking attempts.
  • False Positives. The vast majority of hosts on the Internet, that do reply to pings, won't be DNS servers.

If the above linked thread isn't a deliberate troll in the forum, I suspect that A T & T Technical Support has some explaining to do. The host "ghs.google.com" is an essential component in a Google Custom Domain. If your registrar persists in offering this diagnosis, I strongly suggest that you get another registrar for your custom domain.

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