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Now, You See It - Now, You Don't

Some blog owners create a post, with content that should be visible, only when required.

The post contains a question - accompanied by the answer to the question. The question should be viewed, without the answer being visible, to make the reader think about the answer. This is called, by many, a "spoiler".

Not everybody knows how to construct a spoiler. Some blogs use JavaScript - painful to construct, and maybe not effective for every reader. Security conscious blog readers may block scripts from Blogger blogs - and either your spoiler is visible, immediately - or never becomes visible.

Neither of the latter scenarios make the post a lot of fun to read.

You don't need JavaScript, to make a spoiler.

This is fortunate, because not every reader is going to allow scripts, from every blog. Personally, I block JavaScript, in general - and enable only for my own blogs - and for specific websites, like the Blogger dashboard and most Google pages.

If the blog posts have a solid white background, you make the post text white.

Examine a post, in my text blog.


Two spoilers - both blank.




Click and drag across the first spoiler - and see the first answer.




Click and drag across the second spoiler - and see the second answer.



The spoiler code is not complicated.

What would YOU do?

What Lancelot chose is hidden. But - make <span style="font-weight:bold;">your</span> choice before peeking. To see the answer, highlight the area indicated, by clicking the mouse and dragging the cursor between the arrows.

The answer is here ==><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">Noble Lancelot said that he would allow <span style="font-weight:bold;">her</span> to make the choice herself. Upon hearing this, she announced that she would be beautiful all the time because he had respected her enough to let her be in charge of her own life.</span><==

Now - what is the moral to this story? To see the answer, highlight the area indicated.

The answer is here ==><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">If you don't let a woman have her own way, things are going to get <span style="font-weight:bold;">ugly</span>.</span>==

Hoping that your blog does not use a semi transparent floating background over a multi colour background, just make the text the same color as the background. Then, instruct the reader to click and drag the cursor, to highlight and make the spoiler visible.



A #Blogger blog post which contains a question and answer section is fun to read - but not every blog reader will benefit, with posts that use JavaScript, to hide text content.

An easy way to hide content is to make the text the color of the background. The reader can click and drag, to highlight the text, when then is visible.

http://blogging.nitecruzr.net/2011/10/cookies-vs-scripts-two-types-of-server.html

http://blogging.nitecruzr.net/2009/04/many-faces-of-google.html

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Comments

Sotiris Vlachos said…
Hi Chuck,
Are you sure that invisible or hidden text is not against Google Content Policy?
Regards, Sotiris
Chuck Croll said…
Hi Soltiris,

Thanks for the question. That does sound like a familiar issue, from somewhere.

I just checked Blogger Content - and Google TOS, for "conceal", "hidden", and "invisible" - and can't find anything mentioned.

I'm betting that if it's a problem, you'll find it in Webmasters, as a search indexing degradation issue - and if it's significant, it would involve a) deceptive intent, and b) large volumes of hidden text. Not one or two sentences, in a otherwise visible post.

But if you can find anything relevant, I'd appreciate an update!

https://www.blogger.com/content.g

https://www.google.com/intl/en/policies/terms/

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