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Google+ Sharing, and Search Reputation

Some blog owners use FaceBook or Google+, and share blog posts - and ask what effect sharing and +1 / Like has, on search reputation.
What is the purpose of getting +1's?
The search engines most likely have no special processing, for social action like +1s and Likes - but indexing of content will include social shared content, and notifications of +1s and Likes, from FaceBook and Google+.

A blog post, shared or given a +1, will become part of a Google+ stream - similar to a Blogger blog comment, that is Google+ hosted. The search engines index Google+ stream posts, as they index blogs. There will be similar action from FaceBook content.

A Google+ stream post will include a snippet of the blog post opening paragraph, plus a link to the post.

An indexed stream post will link to the blog post - and provide search reputation.

An indexed stream post will then provide a link to the blog post - and the stream post, when indexed, will lead to indexing of the blog post.

The more shares, and +1s / Likes, received by any blog post, the more reputation from the search engines - because of indexing of Google+ streams. And as a stream post replicates through the streams of Followers, it becomes more visible to the search engines - and one stream post, and blog post, receives still more reputation.

An example stream post, that started with a blog post being shared.

Here's a stream post, from my share of my post Search Engine Reputation, And Vanity Domains, into my Google+ collection, "RBS". Look at the post to the right.


A Google+ stream post, which started with my blog post, shared to Google+.



See what gets shared?

The Google+ post content:

Some #Blogger blog owners are intent on publishing a blog to a custom domain, using a top level domain that relates to the blog subject. They do this, hoping to have a unique blog name.

They may overlook the idea that Blogger blogs benefit from well written and unique content, as much as from a shiny and unique URL.

A photo from the blog post, captioning a link to the blog post:




The blog post title, captioning a link to the blog post:

Search Engine Reputation, And Vanity Domains

The blog URL, captioning a link to the blog post:

blogging.nitecruzr.net

The blog post meta search description:

Blog owners who develop a reputation strategy based on the URL may find that won't help as they hoped. Learn why.

Some or all of that shows in the Notification window and / or peoples streams, when someone +1s, or reshares, that stream post.

The blog post title, and meta search description, are part of a properly constructed post - and properly sized to fit into a Google+ stream column.

This content (with 3 captioned links), when indexed by a search engine, contributes to search engine reputation for the blog post. And as the stream post ripples through the streams of the Followers - and the Followers of the Followers - it contributes more reputation.



A share or Like / +1 of a #Blogger blog post, in a social networking system like FaceBook / Google+, does not contribute directly to a search engine "Share", "Like", or "+1" database - but it does contribute, indirectly, to search reputation for the post in question.

Comments

Angelina L said…
Very informative Chuck, as usual.
Hi Chuck,
Since March of 2016, the G+ +1 of any given Blogger post shared to various G+ Communities has not been properly tallying in Blogger Dashboard. Looking through the Blogger Help Forum, I see that this issue was reported by many bloggers at that time.

Is there a tweak available to fix this yet, or is it possible to elevate the status of this problem so that the G+ +1s are accurately tallied in dashboard next to the appropriate post?

My blog posts at http://www.carlastrozzieri.com went from having hundreds of plus one hits to having a paltry few.

Any suggestions?

Thank you in advance : )
Chuck Croll said…
Hi Carla,

Thanks for the question, it's a known problem.

The Google "+1" is a problem - to Google+ users as well as Blogger blog owners. Calculation of the "+1" involves a variety of Google+ activities - and is never the same for any two Google+ users, similar to comments and followers visibility.

As new Google+ is planned to replace classic Google+, any resolution to the "+1" count confusion will surely only come after classic Google+ is terminated.

http://blogging.nitecruzr.net/2016/02/comments-lost-with-google-comments.html
Thank you, Chuck.
I appreciate your response and hope that the issue resolves soon.
In the meantime, you have given me a reason to finally embrace the new G+.
Thanks again.
Chuck Croll said…
Thanks for the feedback, Carla!

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