Skip to main content

Logging In To Following, Using The Google "One account" Login

Long ago, Blogger Following (aka Google Friend Connect) was part of a non Google community of social networks.

If you wanted to Follow a blog, you had to login to the Followers gadget, but separately from your login session with Blogger. This let you login to Blogger to maintain your blog, and to Follow other blogs, using any desired Blogger or Google account that you wished.

You do not have to Follow other peoples blogs, using the same Blogger or Google account that you use to maintain your blog - nor do you have to logout from your Blogger account that you are using to publish to your blog, so you can Follow somebody else's blog. This lets you separate blog ownership identity from blog Following and surfing activity.

As part of the separate login policy, Following let you login using any Blogger / Google account - or using any one of several non Google accounts, of an interesting variety.

Long ago, your selections, for logging in to Following, included an intriguing complement of hosts, for your Followers account.
  • Google
  • Twitter
  • Yahoo
  • AIM
  • Netlog
  • OpenID

Adding to the intrigue, you could choose from an interesting, and oddly differing, complement of hosts, for your Followers profile.
  • Following (Default)
  • Blogger
  • Google
  • Orkut
  • Netlog
  • Plaxo
  • Twitter

With the coming of the Google "One account" login to Blogger, all of that is simplified. Now, to login to Following, as for Blogger, you get the normal Google "One account" login display.

The login display is carefully labeled, so you know that you are logging in to Following.
Sign in to continue to Google Friend Connect
Other than that label, what you see is the well known "One account" login display.

As with any Blogger / Google login, you can login to a GMail address based Blogger / Google account - or to a non GMail email address based Blogger / Google account. And, if you don't yet have a Blogger or Google account, there is the also familiar link to
Create an account
Clicking on "Create an account", you are given the standard Google "Create your Google Account" wizard.

As with any account creation scenario, I will once, again, remind you that creating a Blogger / Google account creates a responsibility. It is in your best interest to remember and secure the account name and password, and to religiously maintain all backup devices and features, such as backup email account, phone number, and secret question.

As with any Blogger / Google feature, use of the Google "One account" login is subject to your use of a computer with properly configured filters. You need proper filter settings, to permit popup windows, scripts (JavaScript), and third party cookies.

The Google "One account" display, when used for Following, may be subject to the same confusion, as with the Blogger login. Don't use the login account menu, without being aware of possible confusion.

The login process appears to run under "accounts.google.com", presenting cross site relationships with "blogger.com", "blogspot.com", and whatever country code domain, and / or custom domain might affect you, as you view your blog and other blogs.

Interestingly enough, once you are logged in to Following, and you prepare to Follow another blog, you still may get the choice of account hosts.
  • Following (Default)
  • Blogger
  • Google
  • Orkut
  • Netlog
  • Plaxo
  • Twitter
The Google "One account" login only replaces the authentication portion of Following. Just click on the "More options" link, instead of the initial "Follow this blog" button, for an intriguing complement of Following options.

>> Top

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Custom Domain Migration - Managing The Traffic

Your blog depends upon traffic for its success.

Anything that affects the traffic to your blog, such as any change in the URL, affects the success of your blog. Publishing the blog to a custom domain, like renaming the blog, will affect traffic to your blog. The effects of the change will vary from blog to blog, because of the different traffic to every different blog.Followers. People who find your blog because of recommendations by other people.Search engines. Robotic processes which methodically surf your blog, and provide dynamic indexing to people who search for information.Subscribers. People who read your content from their newsfeed reader, such as the dashboard Reading List.Viewers. People who read your content from their browser.No two blogs are the same - and no two blogs will have the same combinations of traffic sources.

Stats Components Are Significant, In Their Own Context

One popular Stats related accessory, which displays pageview information to the public, is the "Popular Posts" gadget.

Popular Posts identifies from 1 to 10 of the most popular posts in the blog, by comparing Stats pageview counts. Optional parts of the display of each post are a snippet of text, and an ever popular thumbnail photo.

Like many Stats features, blog owners have found imaginative uses for "Popular Posts" - and overlook the limitations of the gadget. Both the dynamic nature of Stats, and the timing of the various pageview count recalculations, create confusion, when Popular Posts is examined.