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Blogger Accounts, And Domains Based On Google Apps

We've know, for a while, of the downsides of having a Blogger account that's based on an email address that's provided by a Google Apps based domain.

Some people are unknowingly using email that is based on Google Apps administered service - and they are not even the administrators. A few would be blog owners - or members (of a private or team blog) - are using Google Apps administered domains for their email.

The dangers of using this (obscure) option never becomes relevant to them, until they try to join or setup a Blogger blog.
When I click on the invite link, and try to set up a new Google account, I get the message.
Blogger has not been enabled by the administrator of the domain xxxxxxx.edu.
What do I do, now?

When you are a prospective blog member or owner, and you are using a domain that you control and own - and are able to access the Google Apps administrator account for your domain - you may be able to enable the Blogger service, for the domain.

If you are merely one user of the domain, where your email service is hosted, the situation won't be that simple. If someone else controls the email domain, where you need to use Blogger, you have 2 choices.
  • Convince the domain administrators to enable the Blogger service, in their domain.
  • Setup a web based email account, outside your current service.
Neither solution is ideal.

Not all domain administrators, even for those domains which use GMail services for non "gmail.com" email addresses, believe Blogger blogs to be an essential service. Some believe blog publication to be a frivolous or insecure activity, and will intentionally block use of Blogger in their domains - possibly mandated by a Corporate Security Policy. These administrators are unlikely to attend to your need with any amount of urgency.

Some educational institutions or corporations, which are now using GMail in their private domains, may also consider use of non domain, or web based, email as suspicious activity. This may also present a challenge to you, when you need to use Blogger.

You'll have to make a personal decision, when you are faced with an email account that does not permit Blogger accounts. Just understand the possible reasons why the choice is necessary.

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