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Check The "Adult Content?" Setting For Your Blog

Occasionally, a blog owner may find his blog prefaced by one of two possible content warnings.

The two warnings may look the same (to some folks), but they are set - and removed - in completely different ways. Blog owners need to understand the differences.

Depending upon how / why the "Adult Content" warning is applied, you'll see differing advice.

Content Warning - Initiated by the blog owner.
Content Warning

The blog that you are about to view may contain content only suitable for adults. In general, Google does not review nor do we endorse the content of this or any blog. For more information about our content policies, please visit the Blogger Terms of Service
This is a warning set by the blog owner, using Settings - Other - "Adult Content?".


The blog that you are about to view may contain content only suitable for adults.


Content Warning - Initiated by the blogs readers.
Content Warning

Some readers of this blog have contacted Google because they believe this blog's content is objectionable. In general, Google does not review nor do we endorse the content of this or any blog. For more information about our content policies, please visit the Blogger Terms of Service
This is a warning set by Google, after complaints are submitted by multiple blog readers.


Some readers of this blog have contacted Google because they believe this blog's content is objectionable.


If the warning is reader initiated, the owner can request review.
If the latter warning is in place, the blog owner can request review. If they find nothing objectionable, Blogger will declare the blog acceptable - but their finding will not override any setting made by the blog owner.

As a third possibility, if your blog is only mildly controversial, you can add your own Content Warning to a section of your blog.

You should verify that a review is required, before requesting review.
If the blog owner has to request review of the blog by Blogger, and wait until Blogger can conduct a review, that may be time wasted. If Blogger finds nothing objectionable, they will reset their own flag, and remove the second Content Warning interstitial. The owner selected flag will remain - and the first warning will remain also.

If you find your blog prefaced by a Content Warning (and you disagree with the presence of the warning), first check your dashboard setting, at Settings - Other - "Adult Content". Examine the warning in detail - then request review after you have verified that your "Adult Content?" setting is not enabled.

If you change the setting, remember to clear browser cache, and restart the browser, before concluding that a review by Blogger is necessary.

The warning will not protect the blog against malware / spam classification.
Note that the warning - which ever one is active - is only advisory. Anybody can Agree to the warning, regardless of age or personal preference, by accident or intentionally.

If you advertise the blog, where people who will not appreciate its content may gather, you may still be vulnerable to complaints - and possible deletion, because of complaints received. Don't use the setting as a bulletproof shield - it's not bulletproof.

Comments

Jackaholic said…
so how can i appeal to remove content warning?
Is there any link i can go through the appeal process?
Chuck Croll said…
Hi Jackaholic,

Thanks for the question.

There's no script for requesting removal of the reader requested content warning. Blogger Support knows that if the blog needs a warning, the readers will report it.

You can request that the blog be reviewed, by posting in Blogger Help Forum: Get Help with an Issue. You should remove all dodgy content, first.

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