Now You See It, Now You Don't, Now You See It Again?

Last month, we learned that Google Apps DNS server "66.249.81.121" was permanently out of service.
66.249.81.121 is gone forever. Removing that A record will help.


This evening, I was examining one custom domain "solution", which looked a bit dodgy.

mydomain.com. 10800 IN A 66.249.91.121
www.mydomain.com. 10800 IN CNAME ghs.google.com.

Now, we have "66.249.91.121". A quick HTTP trace shows:

Sending request:

GET / HTTP/1.1
Host: mydomain.com

• Finding host IP address...
• Host IP address = 66.249.91.121

Receiving Header:
HTTP/1.1·302·Moved·Temporarily(CR)(LF)
Location:·http://www.ertmc.ro/(CR)(LF)

Yes, it is alive.

C:\>ping 66.249.91.121

Pinging 66.249.91.121 with 32 bytes of data:

Reply from 66.249.91.121: bytes=32 time=332ms TTL=242
Reply from 66.249.91.121: bytes=32 time=378ms TTL=242
Reply from 66.249.91.121: bytes=32 time=321ms TTL=242
Reply from 66.249.91.121: bytes=32 time=311ms TTL=242

Ping statistics for 66.249.91.121:
Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 311ms, Maximum = 378ms, Average = 335ms

The dead rise again. But, Halloween was a couple weeks ago.
Cue spooky music.

(Update 11/12): I was just informed by a very authoritative source that "66.249.91.121" is not a replacement for "66.249.81.121", and won't remain available. My recommendation, for an asymmetrical DNS configuration, remains:

mydomain.com. 14400 IN A 64.233.179.121
mydomain.com. 14400 IN A 72.14.207.121
www.mydomain.com. 14400 IN CNAME ghs.google.com.


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