Skip to main content

AOL vs BlogSpot

We have multiple reports in Google Blogger Help that AOL is now filtering incoming email on "*.blogspot.com". If someone tries to send the URL of your blog (or their blog), in an email to an AOL customer, that email will be rejected, and the sender gets a return similar to
PERM_FAILURE: Gmail tried to deliver your message, but it was rejected by the recipient domain. The error that the other server returned was:
554 554-: (HVU:B1)http://postmaster.info.aol.com/errors/554hvub1.html
554 TRANSACTION FAILED.

This is apparently a natural result of the perceived BlogSpot spam blog problem. My suspicion is that AOL will suffer more than Google, by doing this. Blogger blog owners may be caught in the middle, unfortunately.

If your blog readership focuses upon AOL customers, you may do well to consider publishing your blog externally. Your BlogSpot URL won't go away - you'll just get a new, non-BlogSpot alias, that you can publicise in email. As in email, to AOL customers.

If you're an AOL customer, get a GMail account. GMail is free, and you should be able to have it extract your AOL email automatically, so you don't have to use the AOL interface.

>> Top

Comments

amr said…
Interestingly, this is only occurring with one of the 3 aol customers I correspond with regularly via email so I didn't understand what was going on at first. All was well once I removed the church blog from my signature but still seems like overkill to refuse everything containing a blogspot domain.
tsduff said…
As a long time AOL customer, I feel that they are being extremely unreasonable to block any and all emails generated by my blogspot url. I hope that Blogger's webmaster will contact AOL and get this resolved as it is very inconvenient.
chris. said…
Yeah, I just talked with a *brilliant* person at AOL about this issue. No lie, she asked me, "so do you own this blog, or do you own Blogger?" I said, "no... that would be Google."

With that said, it seems that their run-of-the-mill tech support is completely clueless as to this issue.
Hope this gets settled soon.

Thanks.
Chuck said…
Chris,

I'll bet they're using a RealTime BlockList to source their filter. RBLs are maintained anonymously, and probably automatically. IOW, I'd doubt that more than one or two people at AOL, if that many, know how to remove something from their filters.
PerfectTosca said…
I am an AOL user, although I only use it for emails. As of May 1, I am not only no longer receiving emails from blogger for moderated comments on my blog, but my friends on GMAIL are blocked now too if they try to send a link of any kind to me!

I just complained to AOL postmaster and they emailed me to tell me the person who wants to email me should call their member services. They don't even mention how I am supposed to get emails from my blog comment section. How absolutely absurd. How am I supposed to know who is trying to email me? I do know of one Gmail friend who can't get through, but I am not PSYCHIC.

I only use AOL for their mail system, which makes it more absurd. I have to keep it because I have dozens of stored file cabinets.

In the meantime, Google should know AOL is sabatoging your blogger customers as well as your gmail customers.
Jeanne said…
Ditto. I called today as per their instructions and they told me that there was something wrong on Google's end, not theirs.

I asked why they can't just remove the filter that blocked blogspot, and she claimed that blogger changed something fundamental about their service, so they were the problem as they were not compliant with AOL's "best practices" email policies.

I looked at the policies (http://postmaster.info.aol.com/guidelines/bestprac.html) and found nothing that blogspot OR gmail (or my use of gmail--I was emailing my in-laws and no one else) violated the policies.

Stupid fucking aol.
Chuck said…
Jeanne,

I'm tempted to C&C your comment, as I almost spit water on my keyboard. ;-)

Tosca,

Try using GMail for essential communication, and see if you can get your AOL client to forward essential email to GMail.

Popular posts from this blog

Custom Domain Migration - Managing The Traffic

Your blog depends upon traffic for its success.

Anything that affects the traffic to your blog, such as any change in the URL, affects the success of your blog. Publishing the blog to a custom domain, like renaming the blog, will affect traffic to your blog. The effects of the change will vary from blog to blog, because of the different traffic to every different blog.Followers. People who find your blog because of recommendations by other people.Search engines. Robotic processes which methodically surf your blog, and provide dynamic indexing to people who search for information.Subscribers. People who read your content from their newsfeed reader, such as the dashboard Reading List.Viewers. People who read your content from their browser.No two blogs are the same - and no two blogs will have the same combinations of traffic sources.

Stats Components Are Significant, In Their Own Context

One popular Stats related accessory, which displays pageview information to the public, is the "Popular Posts" gadget.

Popular Posts identifies from 1 to 10 of the most popular posts in the blog, by comparing Stats pageview counts. Optional parts of the display of each post are a snippet of text, and an ever popular thumbnail photo.

Like many Stats features, blog owners have found imaginative uses for "Popular Posts" - and overlook the limitations of the gadget. Both the dynamic nature of Stats, and the timing of the various pageview count recalculations, create confusion, when Popular Posts is examined.