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Mail-to-Blogger Can Provide Anonymous Ability To Post

In the forums, we see periodically the query
How do I let everyone in my company post to my blog, without requiring them to register?
and my answer is typically
You can let them post comments, but to post actual articles, they will have to register.


And as we have learned, there is a limit in the number of registrations - each blog can have up to 100 members - administrators, authors, and readers - and no more. Apparently, up to 100 people can post to any blog, and no more.

That's not completely true. To use the Blogger Post Editor, through your browser, to post articles, you have to be a registered blog member. But, if you setup a Mail-to-Blogger account, and give out the Mail-to-Blogger email address, anyone knowing the address can post using their email program. Although here, you can moderate any posts, before publishing, should you feel the need.

This solution will have 2 caveats.
  1. You are now opening the blog to anyone who knows the email address. Don't use an easy to guess private address component. And, establish a back door, for distribution of an updated private address component, when you do this. Plan to change the address periodically, and upon quick notice.
  2. This will require that everybody posting use email. They won't be using the post editor. The people using this will have to check their email Inboxes after posting, and look for "undeliverable" notices caused by unexpected changes in the address (caveat #1).


Maybe this procedure will be more useful if you request your anonymous readers post a comment to a specified blog post, you moderate comments, and you can post their articles under your name.

This is not an excellent solution, but until Blogger extends the 100 members limit, maybe it's better than nothing.

Just note that posts composed and submitted, using email, won't be as complete and well formatted, as posts composed in post editor. You may have to add content and formatting, when publishing.

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