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Mail-to-Blogger Author Settings

Recently, we noted the ability of blog Authors to setup their own Mail-to-Blogger access code to a given blog.

As a blog Author (aka "Guest" member), you will note a new Setting tab - "Email", where you now have the ability to setup your own Mail-to-Blogger address - with the public portion of the address set as your normal MTB public address. This is the same feature, that you may have enjoyed on your own blog, as an administrator / owner.

Presumably, you set the private portion of the address to a unique value, which then routes any MTB posts using the "public.private@blogger.com" (aka "account.password@blogger.com") email address to this blog.
We can now post to our blogs, and use MTB with Author identified, instead of anonymous (or name of the blog owner only). Remember, you can change only the "password" (private) portion of the address. The "account" (public) portion is set as a function of your Blogger account, and can't be changed.

Blog administrators have always had this setting, now blog authors have it too. It's right there, in Settings - "Mobile and email", under "Email" - "Posting using email". You can only change the "private" portion of the MTB email address ("secretWords"), then you simply email your posts using "public.private@blogger.com", where the combination of "public.private" is unique for every blog that uses MTB for posting.


This should give us a nice way around the Blogger limit of 100 blog members. Multiple Authors can share a single MTB address (maintained by the administrator), if the blog Member list exceeds 100 entries. Or, with all blog members having their own unique MTB address, everybody can post and be identified.



How you maintain an array of different MTB private addresses, given that you might use MTB for multiple blogs, will be another subject to be addressed.

Comments

J. Buck said…
I need to change the Mail-to-Blogger Address to another name. Can I contact anyone to do this? The original name I used as my personal one. I have now setup another account that is more in line with the blog.

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