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FTP Publishing - An Example Of The Complexity

Publishing a blog to an external server, using FTP, has always presented interesting challenges. I've been writing about those challenges for some time, and occasionally describing their seemingly random nature. This week, we see one example of the randomness, which is being experienced by those publishing to Yahoo Small Business.
I got on the phone with Yahoo Small Business, and went through the trouble shooting process. ... One of the things about the Yahoo Small Business accounts is Yahoo teamed up with ATT SBC. With that team up, it created a weird log on user name, with two @@ in the user name to use FTP publishing. For example: you need both the [email address]@user-[email address]


The solution, in this case, and recommended by Yahoo Small Business is to
create another FTP User ID independent of the main User ID.


In other words, Yahoo Small Business made a change, it wasn't successfully communicated to their customers, and it took a joint session between one customer and one company representative to realise the oddity
a weird log on user name, with two @@ in the user name


Looking further, we see additional details. Having created a Yahoo FTP User ID, we have to make that User ID usable.
once you've added the new FTP user/password in Small Business, be sure to click the link that says "Enable FTP access" in the "FTP Access Point" column. This gives that new username access to publish on your whole site.


I suspect this is simply one example why Google Custom Domains should be the solution of choice for publishing a blog to a non-BlogSpot URL.

Yahoo Small Business is simply one FTP host. How many others might there be, with similar peccadillo's?

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Comments

MichaelVox said…
Thanks for pointing me towards the yahoo/blogger workaround. The link to the google help topic got me through the issue. It's like voodoo to me that a "user2" would work fine, but my original username would not.

BTW, I don't have the double @@ in my address, so that issue wasn't my problem.

Also, this happened to me and is listed at the google help place: After changing Blogger settings to the 'user2' login, blogger will create a duplicate folder which has the latest postings, but will keep the earlier version as is. This means that the "better" version is nested within another folder. It created an entire folder at my domain because my blogger settings used to require a FTP Path with my old yahoo username, but with 'user2' it needs to be blank.

I think I've got it all sorted. I was afraid that having 998 posts was what was causing this.

Thank you for your valuable resource here. I'm still thinking of changing over to wordpress, although I'm told that I can't simply import one to the other.

Woe is me.

MichaelVox.

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