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FTP Published Blogs Redirect BlogSpot URL Automatically?

Ever since Custom Domain publishing was provided by Blogger, one noticeable feature that differentiated custom domain from FTP publishing was the status of the original BlogSpot URL. With a blog published to a custom domain, the original BlogSpot URL was automatically redirected to the new custom domain; but this was not done for blogs published by FTP.

This was a major deficiency too.
  • With the original BlogSpot URL unused, blog readers had to be informed in advance of the pending change.
  • As soon as the blog was published and the BlogSpot URL became available, it was frequently snapped up by splog publishers.
This necessitated publishing of a stub blog, by the former owner, after the blog was published by FTP, informing all that the blog had been moved to another URL.

This deficiency appears to be ended. I was in the process of diagnosing a problem with an FTP published blog, where the owner reported
I can no longer reclaim the original subdomain, as was recommended.


I went to verify the condition of the BlogSpot URL, and observed a very interesting display.


This advice was rather annoying, with custom domain published blogs, but I think it's rather comforting right now.


This is a major improvement for FTP publishing, and it would appear that FTP publishing is intended to be a peer solution to custom domain publishing. From a business standpoint, and considering the problems inherent in publishing by FTP, I still wonder what's the long term plan.

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Comments

Angie said…
Greetings. Looks like ftp publishing is giving lots of people fits in the last few weeks--including me. I've checked the help forums, but haven't seen any evidence that Blogger has acknowledged the problem.

I try to publish but keep getting the "Your publish is taking longer than expected" message. I was able to sneak in one successful publish awhile ago after trying for days--not sure how. Now it isn't working again. I've been ftp publishing for a year and a half now & never had problems like this.

Any ideas of what's going on? Thanks!
Chuck said…
Angie,

I have always believed that what most bloggers see as one large problem with FTP publishing is in reality many small problems. Blaming Blogger for all of the problems is non-constructive, and ensures that the problem will never be resolved.

I also think that Blogger does need to communicate with bloggers more, and avoid all of the time wasting speculation.
Angie said…
Chuck: Thanks for the reply. Just to be clear: I wasn't necessarily blaming Blogger for my publishing problem. I'm just surprised it hasn't been acknowledged by them--on forums or on the "known issues" page or even an e-mail response to the trouble ticket I sent. Lots of people seem to be having same problem.

Now I'm wondering if this is specifically a Yahoo hosted/ftp published problem. My ftp Blogger blog is hosted by Yahoo; it sounds like this is the case for several others on the help forum as well. But Yahoo says everything is working fine, ftp-wise.

Anyway, hope I'm able to start publishing soon. It's frustrating not being able to blog or to give readers a heads-up about why I'm not posting.
Chuck said…
Hi Angie,

I wasn't reacting only to your remarks, but you're right there do seem to be a lot of visible problems expressed in the forums. Whether they really are the same problem is simply a matter for speculation.

Maybe we're looking at an etiological abnormality, brought on by better weather and some people spending more time away from their computers.

I do need to be encouraging Blogger to say something more useful, though.

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