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Custom Domains Use 301 Redirect, From BlogSpot

When you setup a Custom Domain, the setup wizard provides encouraging advice
We won't leave your readers behind!
http://myblog.blogspot.com will redirect to your custom domain.

Blogger accomplishes this bit of trickery, using standard Internet protocol - a 301 Redirect - but it's done in two steps.
  • When you publish your blog, "myblog.blogspot.com", to your custom domain, "mydomain.com", all internal links within the blog are changed, from "myblog.blogspot.com" to "mydomain.com".
  • When the transition period ends 72 hours later, Blogger sets up a standard server based "301 Moved Permanently" for your blog.
  • Note that only the blog internal links are changed - any links which you added, from post to post, are your responsibility. Likewise, all external links are your responsibility.

The search engine spiders, which previously indexed your blog as "myblog.blogspot.com", now index it as "www.mydomain.com".

Everybody who looks at the URL sees the blog published as the domain URL.

Similarly, your readers see "www.mydomain.com". To everybody, even those intending to look at the old BlogSpot URL, you now have "www.mydomain.com" for a blog URL.

The "301 Moved Permanently" referral from BlogSpot is similar to the "301 Moved Permanently" referral used in Custom Domain DNS setups, to equate "mydomain.com" to "www.mydomain.com".

In both cases, when this technique is used properly, the clients - either the people who read the blog, or the search engine spiders that index the blog - see the contents of the blog as being part of the redirect target. Now, they see "www.mydomain.com", instead of "myblog.blogspot.com".

The BlogSpot to domain redirect is installed in the Blogger server, not in the blog.

This "301 Redirect" is server based. If you put a meta tag, or JavaScript, based "301 Redirect" or "302 Redirect" into your blog, you will cause problems for your readers. Both are treated similar to a "302 Moved Temporarily", and your blog loses search engine weight.

In some cases, your readers will see
Too many redirects!
or a similar error, following a gratuitous redirection to block country local domain redirection, installed by you. In other cases, the BlogSpot URL simply does not operate.

Some non Google services, which use a URL to identify you, must be updated.

Note that this redirect applies mainly to search engines, following links. It won't apply to feeds, which need the updated URL in their database. It will apply to your readers - but readers who monitor the address window in the browser may become confused, if they see the new, non-BlogSpot URL where they are accustomed to seeing a BlogSpot URL.

You still need to notify your readers, and you still need to update all external fixed URL references to the blog, such as FeedBurner and other custom feeds, Google Webmaster Tools, and the various visitor meters.

Comments

I did a 301 redirect 2 days ago and my feedburner is continuing to work with the old blogspot URL. Can I just leave feedburner as it is or after a certain period of time will it no longer work? I am afraid to change the original feed for my feedburner as I might lose subscribers? Is this an unfounded fear?
melissa said…
We bought a domain (geeks4film.com) and began publishing to it. Since then, we have realized that it will be much easier to maintain if we used blogger. I have all the files within the geeks4film.com directory, including the podcasts. I got the blogger set up and then did the necessary steps to point the DNS. It worked, but all the links were no longer available (i.e. podcasts). I reverted it back to it's original state. Can I just create a subdomain for all the files, then point the DNS? help! my host sucks!
Michael Sargent said…
My original blog is bubqlishus.com I now want to change the name to michaeldsargent.com I changed the URL as directed under settings/publishing but receive message blog not found. Can you help me and verify that I have done this correctly.
GAUDY MIXTURES said…
You have a very nice blog....and the background that you have used.

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