Skip to main content

The Trinity, And Your Browser

Earlier, I wrote about a triune relationship which affects your access to your blog. That issue is of direct interest to you mainly if you produce a blog hosted on Google servers, but not in "xxxxxxx.blogspot.com", aka a Custom Domain blog. If you're not publishing to a custom domain, that issue still affects you, but indirectly.

But there's another trinity that affects you directly, if you publish any Blogger blog. That's the triune nature of Blogger, with respect to your browser.
  • The code for your blog, ie the posts, template, and widgets, on the Blogger server.
  • The Blogger scripts, on your computer.
  • The cookies, on your computer.


Your browser uses all 3 elements of this trinity, constantly, in helping you maintain your blog, and in letting you and your readers view your blog. When Blogger makes a change to their databases, they likewise produce changes that affect the content of all 3. Unfortunately, Blogger can't control all 3 effectively.

Why can't Blogger control all 3 elements in the trinity? Because they need to be stored on, and run from, your computer (your readers computer).

So what happens when Blogger makes a change to their database, containing your blog? For some period of time after a change is made, your computer, or a readers computer, may or may not request up to date content. It may or may not rebuild or discard a cookie. And if Blogger has changed any portions of any of the 3, and all changes aren't reflected on your computer (your readers computer) simultaneously, the script running on your computer (your readers computer) will come eventually to a point where the blog content and / or the cookies don't match the expectations of the script. On individual computers with this sort of problem, this would produce a Blue Screen Of Death.

Long ago with Blogger, this would have resulted in a well known, monolithic error
We apologize for the inconvenience, but we are unable to process your request at this time. Our engineers have been notified of this problem and will work to resolve it.


After some persuading, Blogger started providing some details, when reporting an error.

You, or your reader will see a variant of
We're sorry, but we were unable to complete your request.

When reporting this error to Blogger Support or on the Blogger Help Group, please:
  • Describe what you were doing when you got this error.
  • Provide the following error code and additional information.
bX-sp4hmm
Additional information
uri: /2006/12/connecting-two-dissimilar-networks.html
host: xxxxxxx.blogspot.com

This information will help us to track down your specific problem and fix it! We apologize for the inconvenience.


That's all that a bX- code is. The Blogger equivalent of a Blue Screen Of Death. But it's one that, in some cases, your computer contributes to - and one for which you have to accept partial responsibility.

>> Top

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Custom Domain Migration - Managing The Traffic

Your blog depends upon traffic for its success.

Anything that affects the traffic to your blog, such as any change in the URL, affects the success of your blog. Publishing the blog to a custom domain, like renaming the blog, will affect traffic to your blog. The effects of the change will vary from blog to blog, because of the different traffic to every different blog.Followers. People who find your blog because of recommendations by other people.Search engines. Robotic processes which methodically surf your blog, and provide dynamic indexing to people who search for information.Subscribers. People who read your content from their newsfeed reader, such as the dashboard Reading List.Viewers. People who read your content from their browser.No two blogs are the same - and no two blogs will have the same combinations of traffic sources.

Stats Components Are Significant, In Their Own Context

One popular Stats related accessory, which displays pageview information to the public, is the "Popular Posts" gadget.

Popular Posts identifies from 1 to 10 of the most popular posts in the blog, by comparing Stats pageview counts. Optional parts of the display of each post are a snippet of text, and an ever popular thumbnail photo.

Like many Stats features, blog owners have found imaginative uses for "Popular Posts" - and overlook the limitations of the gadget. Both the dynamic nature of Stats, and the timing of the various pageview count recalculations, create confusion, when Popular Posts is examined.