Skip to main content

Comments Posted Use "noreply" Email Addresses

Recently, we've noted a number of complaints about Blogger commenting, in Blogger Help Forum: Something Is Broken
.My comments all use a "noreply" email address, instead of my actual email address. How do I have people email their replies to my comments?
This appears to be one more way which Blogger is trying to safeguard our Blogger accounts and blogs, from malicious, technically astute blog thieves.

Some time ago, we observed that this precaution appeared to be unique to Blogger accounts which used Google and Google+ profiles - and did not involve Blogger profiles.

It appears that this is now universal, and includes Blogger profiles, as well as Google / Google+ profiles. It's likely that the noreply email addresses are being offered to keep more blog readers from, inadvertently, exposing their email addresses to email mining techniques.

In remembering the long ago discovered "nice blog" spam, it's possible that "nice blog" spam was originally developed to help the spammers gather email addresses, using very innovative technique.

All that a spammer has to do is to post a "nice blog" comment, select "Email follow-up comments to me" - then watch as the Inbox fills up with follow up comments from bloggers, willingly giving up their email addresses to every stranger also selecting "Email follow-up comments to me", in that comment thread.

The people willingly providing their email addresses, to the world in general, are perfect targets for hackers later trying to brute force access to the Blogger accounts, starting from the provided email addresses. Use of the "no-reply" email address prevents this type of mischief - and reduces the workload of Google Security, as they would otherwise have to verify account / blog integrity, for hacked accounts and blogs.

For even more protection (which is not a bad idea, in any case), consider using Google 2-Step Verification, to protect your Blogger / Google account from hacking.

>> Top

Comments

this comment, for instance; if i chose email comments back to me, i would have assumed my email was not visible to anyone but the blog's author (you). so if you were to respond to my comment, how would i know unless i received an email from you, or would i have to periodically check your post to see if you responded? just a hypothetical. it's good to know that we have security from would be hacks. thanks.
Chuck Croll said…
Angelina,

When you posted your comment, did you check "Email follow-up comments ..."?

I just did. So now, you reply to this comment.
funny thing happened as i was leaving... i noticed the checkbox with my email address. it was there on previous occasions, but not yesterday until AFTER i had published my comment. hmmmm.

this is edited.just figured out what the problem was. i probably had not signed in yet...the same thing happened just now, and i was not logged in. mia colpa
thank you for following up. angelina
i left a comment earlier this a.m. i guess i did not pass the captcha thing. it's not posted. i figured out what i had done wrong. i was not logged into Google. thanks.
Chuck Croll said…
LOL, Angelina,

The other morning, I made coffee, using my Mr. Coffee, while just waking up.

I connected the coffeemaker to power, filled up the coffeepot with water, poured the water into the water tank, shoved the empty coffeepot under the coffee basket, flipped the switch on, and watched the water drip into the pot.

Then I realised that I had not put the ground coffee into the coffee basket.

D'Ohh!

Popular posts from this blog

Custom Domain Migration - Managing The Traffic

Your blog depends upon traffic for its success.

Anything that affects the traffic to your blog, such as any change in the URL, affects the success of your blog. Publishing the blog to a custom domain, like renaming the blog, will affect traffic to your blog. The effects of the change will vary from blog to blog, because of the different traffic to every different blog.Followers. People who find your blog because of recommendations by other people.Search engines. Robotic processes which methodically surf your blog, and provide dynamic indexing to people who search for information.Subscribers. People who read your content from their newsfeed reader, such as the dashboard Reading List.Viewers. People who read your content from their browser.No two blogs are the same - and no two blogs will have the same combinations of traffic sources.

Stats Components Are Significant, In Their Own Context

One popular Stats related accessory, which displays pageview information to the public, is the "Popular Posts" gadget.

Popular Posts identifies from 1 to 10 of the most popular posts in the blog, by comparing Stats pageview counts. Optional parts of the display of each post are a snippet of text, and an ever popular thumbnail photo.

Like many Stats features, blog owners have found imaginative uses for "Popular Posts" - and overlook the limitations of the gadget. Both the dynamic nature of Stats, and the timing of the various pageview count recalculations, create confusion, when Popular Posts is examined.