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The Old "Another blog ..." Problem - The Domain Settings In Google Apps

The use of Google Apps, for resetting the domain settings, frequently requires much repetition - yet seldom produces consistent results. Some blog owners are able to disable a single service to get their domain working, others must recycle the service settings repeatedly - and still others must spend time anxiously recycling one service after another, then looking for more, unnamed services to recycle.

Some blog owners look for shortcuts in the recommended process - such as deleting the Apps account, which simply wastes time. Unfortunately, very few shortcuts, when identified, are consistently effective for other blog owners later. This lack of consistency leads to various comments mentioning lack of useful advice, in the forum discussions.

There are basically 4 levels of complexity involved, in the process of resolving "Another blog ...".
  • Disable one named service.
  • Recycle one named service.
  • Disable multiple services, one by one.
  • Recycle multiple services, one by one.

When the blog owner is able to describe a Sites page display - or we can use an HTTP trace to identify a Sites redirect, we can with some confidence advise the owner to simply disable the Sites service. If simply disabling Sites (or whatever named service - AdServices, Start Page, what have you) is not effective, we then advise recycle the settings, against the named service.

The most basic domain problem report starts with a simple
I keep seeing
Another blog or Google Site is already using this address.
when I try to publish my blog.
Problem reports submitted with this lack of detail, on the other hand, will, most likely, require the owner to recycle multiple service, one by one.

Besides the confusion resulting from the multiple levels of complexity, not all blog owners setup a Google Apps desktop account to administer the domain - even when they purchased the domain using "Buy a domain", and got the "Welcome to Google Apps" email upon purchasing. A blog owner who used "Buy a domain", and neglected to setup the provided Apps account, will be unable to use Apps - and will be unable to access the eNom or GoDaddy Domain Manager, when necessary.

When the domain is purchased directly from a registrar, the blog owner is still less likely to proactively setup the Google Apps account. Fortunately, with the domain purchased directly from the registrar, and having just setup the DNS addresses to publish the blog to the domain, the blog owner will have immediate access to the registrar's Domain Manager wizard.

Another source of frustration, involving the service recycling, is that recycling may require first repairing bogus DNS addresses. Having learned the process of correcting improper DNS addresses, the blog owner must next learn the intricacies of setting up the Apps account, then of recycling multiple service settings, repeatedly.

The solution, recommended by Blogger Support, is to submit a reset request using the "Custom Domain Reset" form. This is not a universally effective solution, unfortunately.
  • Like many services provided by Blogger Support, there is no set schedule for actioning Domain Reset requests.
  • We are never sure what direct feedback will be provided, to the blog owner, upon completion of a reset request.
  • We have been advised by Blogger Support that not all instances of "Another blog" will be consistently resolved by use of the reset request form.

Considering all of these concerns, it's understandable that many blog owners become frustrated, and are occasionally observed stating their intention to return their blogs to BlogSpot hosting.

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