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Blog Owners Reporting Custom Domain Setup Showing "This operation failed."

This week, we're seeing a few reports, in Blogger Help Forum: Something Is Broken from blog owners, trying to publish their blogs to custom domains.
I'm trying to use the Publishing wizard - and I'm seeing a new error.
This operation failed. Try again later. If the problem persist, please file a post on the help forum.
What has Blogger changed, recently?

It appears that we are now seeing a new phrasing of the well known error
Another blog is already hosted at this address
The majority of the domains showing this error, when checked, have bogus or missing DNS addresses. We see the usual demurrals.
I just got off the phone with the registrar. They say everything is fine on their end.
This is simply more of the same - registrars that still do not understand the importance of using referral, as opposed to forwarding, for custom domain publishing.

Once again, I cannot over emphasise the importance of righteous DNS addresses, when setting up a custom domain. It appears that, contrary to current instructions from Blogger Help, there is still just one working DNS address model, for custom domain publishing.

If you try to publish your blog to a custom domain, and the domain has any DNS addresses defined, the addresses must be righteous. If the defined addresses do not match the one known DNS model, expect now to see a new monolithic error.
This operation failed.

In some cases, it's possible that newly purchased domains, not subject to the Transition period earlier provided by "Buy a Domain", may display this error because of DNS propagation latency. New domain owners, even when they are able to setup a domain properly, may see this error because the new domain is simply not visible to all Internet DNS servers.

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Comments

j said…
As you state, most custom domain setup problems on Blogger are a result of failure to properly set up the DNS settings at the Registrar as required by Google. The second reason, which you do not mention, is that AFTER you enter those DNS settings, you often have to allow 24 hours for the settings to propagate throughout the internet before Blogger will successfully allow use of the custom domain. In the internet age users expect "instantaneous" results. This is one area where "instant" doesn't necessarily apply.
Chuck Croll said…
J,

Thank you for pointing this out.

This has been a latent issue for several months, after Blogger ended the "Buy a Domain" feature.

http://blogging.nitecruzr.net/2013/10/new-custom-domains-purchased-from.html

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