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Blogger Blogs Displaying Mysterious Transparent Boxes, Covering Blog Content

We're seeing a steady flood of problem reports about various Blogger blogs that have developed a mysterious transparent box, covering some portion of the blog surface when displayed. Some blogs display the box for all views, others for main page view only, and still others for specific individual posts. The box may be visible at the top of the page or in the middle - and may scroll with the screen, or may remain fixed relative to the display. In many cases, it blocks important blog content, and / or prevents clicking on crucial links.

Initial observations, during the immediately previous 2 - 3 days. referred to a "FaceBook or similar Social Networking gadget". Digging deeper, and looking closely at reported cases, we can look for the problem itself.

After repeated examination of multiple cases, we're seeing a more specific pattern, in the problem source code. Using a text browser tool, we find the following code (with gratuitous line breaks added for readability), which appears to be the kernel of the problem.

<div id="fb-root"></div><script>
(function(d, s, id) {
  var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0];
  if (d.getElementById(id)) return;
  js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id;
  js.src = "//connect.facebook.net/en_US/all.js#xfbml=1";
  fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);
}(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk'));
</script><br />
<div class="fb-like"
data-href="https://www.facebook.com/xxxxxxxxxxx"
data-send="false" data-show-faces="true" 
data-width="450"></div>

(Note that "xxxxxxxxxxx" will be the FaceBook user name, providing the proper addressing to the account where the "Like" transaction is targeted).

The problem appears to involve the FaceBook Like accessory. It's possible that FaceBook Support can provide a better diagnosis - but for right now, I'll simply suggest removal of the above code. In the cases where the code was installed into an empty HTML / JavaScript gadget (and with no other accessories installed there also), I'll advise removal of the gadget containing the code.

If you can identify the problem gadget in your blog, you can edit the gadget, and Remove it.

As an alternate solution, you may add CSS which will hide the boxes. Only time will tell, if this is a better alternative for many blog owners. Using the "Add CSS" wizard in the Template Designer Advanced menu, add the following:
#fb_xdm_frame_http, #fb_xdm_frame_https
{
 display:none !important;
}

Depending upon your level of technical comfort and expertise, you may elect any one of three solutions.
  1. Remove the entire HTML gadget.
  2. Remove the specific problem code.
  3. Add CSS to hide the problem.
It's your blog, and your accessories.

Note that after you add or remove the code in question, and save the changes, you will need to clear browser cache and restart the browser, to accurately test success in resolving the problem.

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Comments

Troy Chapman said…
Thank you for this help! I was one of the people who questioned this on the Blogger forum and I received your answer (only after digging it out of my spam filter).
Alyssa said…
Thank you for your help, I just had to past because mine doesn't seem to be my Facebook, I tried removing it... well I tried lots of things that didn't work.
Thanks for posting this. After trying G+ Blogger Help (and getting none) Your tip fixed my problem. I can't thank you enough!

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