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With Following, Bloggers Follow Blogs, Not People

I publish several blogs, each blog covering a different subject.

Each of my blogs have Followers - and the different Followers are interested in the different subjects of those blogs.
With Following, a blogger selects any given blog, Follows that blog, and gets a subscription to that blog, using the news feed reader of his / her choice.

People choose a blog in a cluster - and Follow, based on interest.

Besides choosing a news feed reader, the blogger has a choice of which blog to Follow. People interested in my blogging advice choose to Follow The Real Blogger Status (you are here). People interested in my recipes choose to Follow Chuck's Kitchen.

Some folks who find my blogs find them through blogging issues, others through recipes, and still others have found me through networking issues. Some folks interested in blogging later become interested in my recipes blog too. That's their business, because that's their interest.

People Follow the blogs that attract their interest.

Bloggers Follow what interests them. That's the bottom line. Provide material that interests them, and they will Follow.

And with that in mind, be careful when planning to rename a blog that has Followers.

Comments

tantra flower said…
The average person's need to feel accepted is a very interesting thing. Following is for the convenience and pleasure of the reader, but instead has turned into status symbol for the blogger. I'm not saying that Followers aren't a genuine concern for bloggers, if you are in sales, someone who is using your blog to launch your career, you have a blog with useful information that you want to reach as many people as possible, or you want to connection with people who share a common interest. That I get.

What I don't get is when people with a personal blog (like mine) expect people to follow. We should be flattered when somebody does think we're interesting, but given the rather selfish nature of the personal blog, don't get upset when hundreds of people don't want to read whatever rant, concern, or cute thing your kid did that day, you know? lol
Chuck said…
Tantra,

All very interesting thoughts. I'd like to explore some of these thoughts in depth, if you'll post in GBH: Something Is Broken, or in Nitecruzr Dot Net - Blogging.

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