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Required field must not be blank #2

Look carefully at this picture. You may have to click on the small image, to see the detail in full size.

Do you see the URL window at the top, where you might type "www2. blogger. com", for instance, to login?


http://www.blogger.com/post-create.g?
blogID=24069595


When you use something like the Post Editor, you go thru a series of screens. That is the first screen.

And this is the second screen.

Look at the URL at the top now.


http://www.blogger.com/publish-confirmation.g?
blogID=24069595&postID=7449672810113528192
×tamp=1178898790159&javascriptEnabled=true


And if you select Edit Post, to update what you just posted, you're back here.

And again look at the URL at the top.


http://www.blogger.com/post-edit.g?
blogID=24069595&postID=7449672810113528192


So what, Chuck, are all of those URLs? And why should I care about that?

Well, the next time you get an error
Required field must not be blank.

look at the URL more carefully. You'll see a malformed URL, that's missing key fields. That's the symptom.

Many scripts in Blogger, that take several screens, and involve pushing buttons, will retain key information in the URL. That URL is a dynamic call to the web server.

http://www.blogger.com/post-create.g?
blogID=24069595


The ? identifies a dynamic call. What follows the ? are the arguments (data passed) to the dynamic call. In this example, the blogID is the argument. If that argument was missing, guess what symptom I would get, when I edit this blog.

The next time you use Blogger, look at the URLs.
  • Creating, or editing, a post.
  • Logging in to Blogger.
  • Making a comment on a blog (yours or somebody else's).


Now that you know how to identify the symptom, help us to diagnose the problem.

>> Forum thread links: bX-*00037

>> Copy this tag: bX-*00037

>> Top

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