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Login Problems Related To Blogger Beta

One big problem with Blogger, right now, is the confusion over authentication. Under classic Blogger, you could have a Blogger account, with an account name. That account could be tied to any email account, with any email service. Blogger Beta ties your Blogger access to a Google email address.

Unfortunately, even though you're not using Blogger Beta, you may be affected by changes to Classical Blogger, which support the Beta.

Blogger Employee
seems to consider this possibility. And Blogger Buzz: Beta Update! describes issues that are relevant here too.

One reader writes of using the same account and password, in both Blogger and Google, and experiencing this problem. He reports a successful workaround, achieved by changing the password on one account.

Comments

Luv2cook said…
Well..thank you for this link BUT the blogger people DO NOT explain how the login works if you have the same username and password for both blogger and google...argh...
Fausta said…
How do I increase my bandwith?

My blog http://faustasblog.com is fried because of not enough bandwith but I can't find any information on how to increase the bandwith.
Chuck said…
Fausta,

Bandwidth problems experienced by your website are beyond the scope of this blog, and of the various Blogger forums. That is a matter that must be solved by you, and whoever provides the server that hosts your blog.

If you have a free service, it's a matter of convincing the server owner. If it's a paid service, it's usually a matter of paying more.
Dirty Butter said…
Thanks for keeping everyone up to date on everything going on with the beta. It's been great having a place to come and find out what's going on. I'm enjoying the features on my beta blog, and I hope the migration goes smoothly whenever my turn comes. I'm in no hurry, though.

BV
Daniel said…
I'd be happy just to be able to login and see my dashboard. At the moment after a 'failed' migration I can't even login and my google account (now my default blogger login) redirects to 'Could not switch you to the new Blogger'. Consequently, I'm in 'Blogger purgatory' where I can only use my original blogger login to comment on blogs without comment moderation...

If switching back to 'Classic Blogger' and actually having any access to my blogs was an option, given my rather irritating situation/screwed up migration, I'd take it with open arms. I appreciate betas can be problematic, I just don't appreciate being locked out indefinately... :/
RavenGrrl said…
i love this blog - it's incredibly useful. I wish I didn't have a headache right now (caused, no doubt by the so-called "switch" to beta blogger and the loss of a new blog I spent hours setting up and tweaking yesterday -- in beta -- it was there and then it wasn't. argggh! thanks for listening.

so i wish i didn't have a headache. i wish i had time right now to read every single archived post on your blog. i wish i had the patience to actually figure out what the hell went wrong with that new blog -- plus why do they keep telling me they had trouble/couldn't migrate my other two blogs when blogger actually invited me to make the switch? sigh.

no need to answer that. it's rhetorical. I think what I really have to do is go find some aspirin.

:-)
Maureen
Chuck said…
Hi Maureen,

Aspirin is OK, if you're not allergic.

I prefer scotch, or vodka.

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