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Without The PostID, A Deleted Post Is Not Easily Recovered

If you delete a post (page) in your blog, it's a simple matter to recover the post - as long as you know the PostID. Unfortunately, once the post is gone, finding the post (page) id is not a simple matter - especially for those who would typically delete a page or post without planning. Blogger does not provide the PostID in any list, that we might save, periodically, to reference later.

The task of retrieving a deleted page or post is particularly frustrating, for owners of private blogs. Private blogs probably won't be cached, nor do they publish a blog feed - and without either a cache entry, or a feed reference, the PostID for a deleted post is not easily obtained.

Right now, once you delete a page or post, in a private blog, you're out of luck - unless you have cached the blog on your own computer. Retrieving from local cache is not an issue to be productively discussed in Blogger Support, as it is going to be as individual as your computer may be.

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Comments

Mary Curtin said…
Sorry, but I must disagree: recovering a post is easy, you just go to the backup file you took, load the posts to a temporary private blog, and copy the contents of post.

If someone could not be a***d taking regular backups, then they have no right to expect to be able to recover deleted posts.
Jim McKee said…
Here's a thought: Instead of immediately deleting a post, blog owners may want to consider reverting the post to draft, which will remove it from being published, but not delete it. Leave it in draft status for a while, until you're really sure you want to delete it. (Alternately, leave it in draft status indefinitely... It doesn't hurt anything, and you may want to pick out parts of it for another post.)

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