Skip to main content

A Blog Deleted, As A Suspected Spam Host, Is Not Subject To The 90 Day Limit For Restore

We see signs of panic, periodically, in Blogger Help Forum: Something Is Broken, about blogs deleted as suspected spam hosts.
My blog was deleted for spam 2 months ago. I need my blog restored, this month, as I don't want to lose it!
This is a common misconception, about spam deletions, and the mysterious 90 day limit.

There's no deadline for either the start, or the completion, of the review process, when a blog is classified as a suspected spam host. The owner may request review a year after the blog is deleted - if he's willing to wait for a year without concern. Alternately, he may ask for review the same day that he discovers the blog is offline. When the review is requested, Blogger Support may be immediately available, and may return a blog to service that same day - or they may be busy, and require a month to respond.

When the blog does get reviewed, the rules are simple.
  • If the blog is judged to be righteously classified, the blog is deleted, with the URL locked to the deleted blog.
  • If the blog is judged to be spuriously classified, the blog is restored, and control is returned to the owner.
In either case, the URL is not made available to the public.

This is either good news (if you are the owner), or bad news (if you wish that you were the owner).

You cannot gain control of the blog, or of the URL, by reporting the blog as a spam host - whether the blog has 1 post (one post published 10 years ago), or 3650 posts (one post published daily, for 10 years). If the blog appears to be inactive, your only option is to contact the owner, directly. If Blogger classifies an inactive blog, following your reporting the blog as a spam host, the blog will remain deleted or locked, until the owner requests review.

If the owner deletes the blog, the URL may - or may not - be made available.

Pick an available URL, and start your blog - and concentrate on the interests of your readers.

>> Top

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Custom Domain Migration - Managing The Traffic

Your blog depends upon traffic for its success.

Anything that affects the traffic to your blog, such as any change in the URL, affects the success of your blog. Publishing the blog to a custom domain, like renaming the blog, will affect traffic to your blog. The effects of the change will vary from blog to blog, because of the different traffic to every different blog.Followers. People who find your blog because of recommendations by other people.Search engines. Robotic processes which methodically surf your blog, and provide dynamic indexing to people who search for information.Subscribers. People who read your content from their newsfeed reader, such as the dashboard Reading List.Viewers. People who read your content from their browser.No two blogs are the same - and no two blogs will have the same combinations of traffic sources.

Stats Components Are Significant, In Their Own Context

One popular Stats related accessory, which displays pageview information to the public, is the "Popular Posts" gadget.

Popular Posts identifies from 1 to 10 of the most popular posts in the blog, by comparing Stats pageview counts. Optional parts of the display of each post are a snippet of text, and an ever popular thumbnail photo.

Like many Stats features, blog owners have found imaginative uses for "Popular Posts" - and overlook the limitations of the gadget. Both the dynamic nature of Stats, and the timing of the various pageview count recalculations, create confusion, when Popular Posts is examined.