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Custom Domain Publishing, And Google Apps - December, 2008

In last month, I wrote about the details of the first change to the Asymmetrical (aka Google Apps) Custom Domain configuration, since June 2008. The Asymmetrical configuration started out as a trio of DNS servers, providing addressing for the domain root (aka "naked domain").

mydomain.com. 3600 IN A 64.233.179.121
mydomain.com. 3600 IN A 66.249.81.121
mydomain.com. 3600 IN A 72.14.207.121
www.mydomain.com. 3600 IN CNAME ghs.google.com.

In November 2008, "66.249.81.121" was removed from service, giving us a pair.

mydomain.com. 3600 IN A 64.233.179.121
mydomain.com. 3600 IN A 72.14.207.121
www.mydomain.com. 3600 IN CNAME ghs.google.com.

Now, it appears that "64.233.179.121" is gone, too.

C:\>ping 64.233.179.121

Pinging 64.233.179.121 with 32 bytes of data:

Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.

Ping statistics for 64.233.179.121:
Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 0, Lost = 4 (100% loss),


We see numerous reports this week like
I've been using a custom domain successfully for the last 8 months. I purchased a custom domain name through Google. This afternoon I started noticing that every other page load of any blog page started showing:

Server not found
Error 404

An excerpted HTTP trace confirms our suspicion.

Sending request:

GET / HTTP/1.1
Host: mydomain.com
User-Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 5.1; en-US; rv:1.8.1.18) Gecko/20081029 Firefox/2.0.0.18
Connection: close

• Finding host IP address...
• Host IP address = 64.233.179.121
• Finding TCP protocol...
• Binding to local socket...
• Connecting to host...
Maximum execution time of 15 seconds exceeded!
Done


Now, we have one Google Apps DNS server left.

mydomain.com. 3600 IN A 72.14.207.121
www.mydomain.com. 3600 IN CNAME ghs.google.com.

Soon, I believe, we'll be told to use the new Google Apps Engine servers.

mydomain.com. 1800 IN A 216.239.32.21
mydomain.com. 1800 IN A 216.239.34.21
mydomain.com. 1800 IN A 216.239.36.21
mydomain.com. 1800 IN A 216.239.38.21
www.mydomain.com. 3600 IN CNAME ghs.google.com.


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Comments

Avilio said…
hello to Nitecruzr... thanks for helping... and I think is this also a part of the reason why my blog... www.aviliojimenez.com is not working :( arhhhggg I'm following now for more updates through your RSS.
Simon Kjellberg said…
Weird. Thanks for the info.

Will this cause trouble for us like it did when they took down the "66.249.81.121" server? Should we delete "64.233.179.121" as well from our records or just wait for further info from Google?

Thanks, Simon.
http://www.awesomeness.se
Chuck said…
Simon,

If I advise using an asymmetrical DNS configuration, I either advise use of the 4 new servers, or "72.14.207.121" by itself. If your domain is using "64.233.179.121" and / or "66.249.81.121", yes you will have problems.
Timcom said…
It would have been kinda nice if Google would have let us know.
Chuck said…
Tim,

Amen. I started out this blog by writing about Blogger Silence. While they appear to be making some effort to improve on that issue, I maintain that given the amount of money that flows through Google, they could improve a lot more, and look a lot better in doing so.
Rowena said…
Wow, thanks so much for this post. It's helped me figure out what the heck is wrong with my blog. I swapped out the IP's and things seem to be back to normal so thanks a whole bunch for this article, you rock!
Carlos Martins said…
Seems this was exactly what happened to me - though it's strange it just affected on of my blogs, while the others keep working fine (though now I suspect it's only a matter of time before they'll stop working too... :/

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