Skip to main content

Arranging Text And Pictures Within Your Blog Posts

When you use post editor to create a blog post, and you use the convenient picture upload wizard in the post editor, you notice one annoying behaviour. No matter where the cursor is when you upload a picture, the picture always gets uploaded at the top of the post. Multiple pictures get uploaded at the top, each one placed above the next.

If you like your pictures interleaved with the text, you then have 2 choices.
  • Upload the pictures in the post before you write the text. Plan the order and arrangement of the pictures, then add text, before and after each picture.
  • Relocate each picture, one at a time.
    • If you upload in Compose mode, learn how to grab, drag, and drop each picture, into the desired location.
    • If you upload in "Edit HTML" mode, learn how to cut and paste the exact components of code, into the desired location.


If you relocate the pictures after uploading, do so carefully. There are known problems with certain browsers, using drag and drop under Compose mode. And if you don't know what you're doing, it's easy to cut and paste incomplete portions of code, if you cut and paste under "Edit HTML" mode. Learn how to backup and restore the blog, before taking chances.

However you upload the pictures, remember if you use "Edit HTML" mode, and you setup the pictures to float (with text arranged beside each picture), to follow each picture with a break, clearing on the same side as the picture. And after you do this, stay in "Edit HTML" mode for editing that post. If you switch to "Compose" mode, you'll find that the floating and breaks will get dropped.

I make it a habit to always switch back to "Edit HTML" mode before Publishing a post. That way, whenever you open a post, you will always be in "Edit HTML" mode, predictably. Open a post in "Compose" mode, after you previously published it with carefully arranged pictures, just once, and you won't do that again.

>> Top

Comments

Lois K. said…
This was the simplest explanation I've found. Thank you.
Warren Wheeler said…
this has been driving me nuts for months. thank you, thank you thank you.
You have no idea how helpful your post has been to me. Thank you so much. Clear, concise and straight to the point- you've made my life a lot easier!
Anthonia said…
Thanks.

Popular posts from this blog

Custom Domain Migration - Managing The Traffic

Your blog depends upon traffic for its success.

Anything that affects the traffic to your blog, such as any change in the URL, affects the success of your blog. Publishing the blog to a custom domain, like renaming the blog, will affect traffic to your blog. The effects of the change will vary from blog to blog, because of the different traffic to every different blog.Followers. People who find your blog because of recommendations by other people.Search engines. Robotic processes which methodically surf your blog, and provide dynamic indexing to people who search for information.Subscribers. People who read your content from their newsfeed reader, such as the dashboard Reading List.Viewers. People who read your content from their browser.No two blogs are the same - and no two blogs will have the same combinations of traffic sources.

Stats Components Are Significant, In Their Own Context

One popular Stats related accessory, which displays pageview information to the public, is the "Popular Posts" gadget.

Popular Posts identifies from 1 to 10 of the most popular posts in the blog, by comparing Stats pageview counts. Optional parts of the display of each post are a snippet of text, and an ever popular thumbnail photo.

Like many Stats features, blog owners have found imaginative uses for "Popular Posts" - and overlook the limitations of the gadget. Both the dynamic nature of Stats, and the timing of the various pageview count recalculations, create confusion, when Popular Posts is examined.