Skip to main content

Redirecting Traffic From A Blogger Blog To Non Google Hosting

Occasionally in Blogger Help Forum: How Do I?, we see the innocent question
How do I redirect traffic, automatically, from my Blogger blog to my WordPress blog?
or
I just moved my blog to a real website - how do I get my readers from my Blogger blog to my website?
This need, like redirecting traffic between BlogSpot URLs, is one feature that Blogger will probably not ever provide.

If Blogger were to allow the automatic forwarding of traffic, from a Blogger blog to a non Google website, spammers could use BlogSpot blogs as gateways, and move their spam content around, at will. You can redirect traffic from a BlogSpot URL to a non BlogSpot URL - but you must use a properly setup custom domain, to do this.

You can combine your Blogger blog(s) with a non Google website, if you think about it.
  • Setup a virtual host pair, in the website domain.
  • Publish your blog to the virtual host.
  • Add a custom link bar to the blog, and the website.
  • Use the same template on the blog and the website.
  • Use your imagination.

The latter solution simply requires some Blogger content in your blog, which is then merged into a non Blogger website. It just doesn't allow you to simply redirect your Blogger blog straight into a non Blogger website. And if you see some Blogger blogs that do seem to redirect to a non Blogger / Google URL, those are just blogs that haven't been given an offsite redirect warning interstitial - or classified as a spam host - yet.

>> Top

Comments

Isaiah Joseph said…
Wonderful tutorial..
i just did it with Jamb 2013 website

Popular posts from this blog

Custom Domain Migration - Managing The Traffic

Your blog depends upon traffic for its success.

Anything that affects the traffic to your blog, such as any change in the URL, affects the success of your blog. Publishing the blog to a custom domain, like renaming the blog, will affect traffic to your blog. The effects of the change will vary from blog to blog, because of the different traffic to every different blog.Followers. People who find your blog because of recommendations by other people.Search engines. Robotic processes which methodically surf your blog, and provide dynamic indexing to people who search for information.Subscribers. People who read your content from their newsfeed reader, such as the dashboard Reading List.Viewers. People who read your content from their browser.No two blogs are the same - and no two blogs will have the same combinations of traffic sources.

Stats Components Are Significant, In Their Own Context

One popular Stats related accessory, which displays pageview information to the public, is the "Popular Posts" gadget.

Popular Posts identifies from 1 to 10 of the most popular posts in the blog, by comparing Stats pageview counts. Optional parts of the display of each post are a snippet of text, and an ever popular thumbnail photo.

Like many Stats features, blog owners have found imaginative uses for "Popular Posts" - and overlook the limitations of the gadget. Both the dynamic nature of Stats, and the timing of the various pageview count recalculations, create confusion, when Popular Posts is examined.