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The Post Editor And Spell Checking

Blogger, and the Post Editor, are wonderful tools in helping us produce a legible and quick document on the Internet.

Blogging is an easy way of reaching out to the world with our messages, and many folks are doing just that; without interference from porn blogs, many messages are being seen again. Yet the post editor presents us with a major challenge.

The post editor is designed to save us from ourselves, and our spelling and syntax mistakes. In whatever language we type, when we make egregious mistakes, the post editor automatically corrects our mistakes. And in some cases, what we type must be used as "commands" to the post editor, or to the browser as it processes the HTML in our blogs.

What happens if we, intentionally, type a mistake, to show others what mistakes not to make outside the post editor?

Our intentional "mistakes" are corrected, without our intent. So Blogger, and intentional HTML design, provides us a way to intentionally type things that are outside normal syntax.

When you compose a post, in "HTML" mode, you can't type "G0d", in some cases. Not as "G0d", anyway, without the spell checker being involved. In some cases, you have to type "G0d".

Similarly, we can't type "<" and ">" in our text, as the "<" and ">" characters are used as control characters in HTML. In these cases, we have to type "&lt;" and "&gt;", respectively, unless the post editor "Compose mode" setting is usable. And there are more techniques for coding other special characters, some of which don't even appear on the keyboard. For these, we need character reference tables.

For more information about "&" coding, see ASCII Code - The extended ASCII table, So, You Want An "& Command", Huh?, and HTML Character Sets. For character reference tables, see HTML ISO-8859-1 Reference, and HTML ASCII Reference.

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