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Private Blogs, And Dynamic Blog Access

Occasionally, someone may publish a blog as private, invite / accept readers, then later decide that results are not as positive as desired.

It's easy enough to change a blog, from Private to Public. Just go to the Permissions wizard, in the dashboard menu Settings - Basic, and change Blog Readers from "Private" to "Public".

Unfortunately, this may not leave everybody able to access the blog.
I made my blog public, last week. Some of my friends are now seeing
Your current account does not have access to view this page.
Why is this still an issue?
The blog owner, in this case, is seeing the effect of cache, and authentication.

In many cases, simple instructions to "clear cache, cookies, and sessions" may resolve this problem. This does not always work, however - and the mystery why it does not always work may frustrate us, almost as much as the original symptom.

Sometimes, clearing private data - even though it may be a bit drastic - does nothing to resolve the problem at hand.
I just did that - and there's no improvement!
Now, we suspect that there is a cache, outside the browser, that can't be cleared.

There is no permanent solution, for upstream cache. But, there may be a diagnostic step, that helps us understand what is going on.

This is the URL of this blog.
http://blogging.nitecruzr.net/
If I need to access the main page, without refreshing the browser, or clearing cache, I can retrieve the updated content, on a temporary basis.
http://blogging.nitecruzr.net?
A URL containing a "?" is normally used for retrieving a web page, dynamically, with extra settings embedded in the URL.
http://blogging.nitecruzr.net?something
A dynamic retrieval is evaluated immediately, using the Blogger server (in this case) - and without any interference from any caches.

Even without a real need to have the URL evaluated by the server, we can still make the URL dynamic, just by adding the "?" at the end. And this bypasses any cache - including cache upstream from the browser.
http://blogging.nitecruzr.net?
Just remember - this is a temporary solution.

If you forget to use the "?" later - and you retrieve the old web page, still in cache, don't be surprised to keep seeing
Your current account does not have access to view this page.
Until the cached page expires normally, from the cache that you can't control, that's going to still be a possibility.

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