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New Custom Domains "In Transition" And Following / Friend Connect

We've known about the gestation period of new custom domains, aka "This blog is In Transition", for some time. When you load a blog recently republished to a custom domain, using its existing BlogSpot URL, you get an updated blog - the new domain URL in the internal links, such as the feed URLs in the header - but you get the blog at the BlogSpot URL. The "301 Moved Permanently" redirect from the BlogSpot URL doesn't come about until after the transition period ends.

This helps avoid the well known
Server Not Found

Error 404
when using the BlogSpot URL to address a blog, just published to a new domain, which hasn't propagated through the DNS infrastructure.

Recently, folks using Following started observing an oddity
We're sorry...
This gadget is configured incorrectly. Webmaster hint: Please ensure that "Friend Connect Settings - Home URL" matches the URL of this site.
Apparently this is a condition in Following now, as the blog at the BlogSpot URL tries to load the Following gadget which is, of course, configured for the new domain, along with all of the other internal blog linkages.

Look at the browser address window, in each example below, very carefully.


This is what you get when you view "tsishow.blogspot.com" (right now, anyway).



This is what you get when you view "www.tsishow.com" (until we see some Followers, which are surely coming).



For right now, we may have to grit our teeth for a few days, until the Transition period expires. But while you wait, read why it's necessary, and how it works. It's there to help you and your new custom domain, so become informed.

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Comments

Susan said…
This is probably a stupid idea - but, wouldn't it make sense to run two blogs simultaneously for a month when transitioning? They are free afterall. Just run the exact same thing on a custom domain and on blogspot.
Chuck said…
Susan,

An innovative thought, but not a good idea. Two blogs will be seen as "duplicate content" by the search engines, and both blogs would be penalised.
Susan said…
Ooops! There goes my other good idea - post everything on Wordpress two months behind my blog. It would make for a good backup. And it would get more exposure by being on Wordpress also (Wordpress always seems to be more newsy and less crafty). Hmmm ... back to the drawing board.

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