Skip to main content

Error 550 When Publishing By FTP

If you're publishing to an external host (not Blog*Spot) by FTP (or SFTP), you may be seeing any of several errors in the log
Error 550: Access is denied.
Error 550: Requested action not taken: file unavailable.
Error 550: The system cannot find the path specified.

If so, you may want to check your FTP Publishing setting. The FTP Path setting points to the location of your blog, relative to the root folder in the FTP server.

If the value for your FTP Path is "/", you should change it to ".", or possibly vice versa. Some servers require a setting of "/", which points to the absolute path of the root folder on the server; others require relative paths, such as ".", which points to the FTP root. This issue is discussed in Blogger Help Group: Publishing Trouble Bizarre Blogger Publishing Problem, help!!, and in my article Path Variances When Publishing By FTP.

We've noted in some discussions that, after you change the path to ".", for instance, the Blogger script may change the setting to "./", or even "/". But your initially changing it to "." appears to be a key step, nonetheless. Save the setting, Republish, and test.

Besides the Publishing FTP Path, which indicates where the main blog is stored, there are additional settings, of equal importance. Blogger Help: What is the FTP path? discusses this, and more, in greater detail.

You may also find Microsoft Error message in IIS: "530 User cannot log in. Login failed." to be of interest.

>> Top

Comments

Anonymous said…
thank you SOOOOO much. This was driving me crazy last night and today. Thank goodness Google brought me to you!
Thomas said…
I was getting these errors and tried your fix. Everytime I saved my changes, the blogger interface seemed to set it right back to its original '/'.
Nonetheless, when I republished the problem was fixed!

Thanks!
gina said…
Thank you, thank you, THANK YOU!

This was precisely my problem. I'm not sure how long the badaid will last, but at least for now I have a workaround!

Thanks again.
Anonymous said…
Thank you!! No idea why or how this publishing problem started for my blog, but this fixed it. :)
Anonymous said…
After 11 days of not being able to publish (out of the blue) I found this and it saved my sanity! :) Thank you so much for the help.
Mike said…
thank you thank you this problem was driving me crazy and I would never have found the answer in Blogger's help.

Note: I entered "." and Blogger changed it to "./" buit it worked.
clifford said…
awesome!! it was frustrating me to all hell that i couldn't post. all my friends were like - WTF!- did you die?

Thank you thank you thank you.

And of course - MERRY CHRISTMAS!
surfur said…
For anyone trying publish their blog to a site hosted on a webfusion Microsoft server you may want to try altering the ftp path in blogger's publish settings to web/content/NameOfYourBlogDirectory/
I just discovered this worked for me after several hours trial and error. Also note for some reason Blogger reports errors after I click upload, but when I checked this on my website (using dreamweaver) the files had been uploaded.

Popular posts from this blog

Custom Domain Migration - Managing The Traffic

Your blog depends upon traffic for its success.

Anything that affects the traffic to your blog, such as any change in the URL, affects the success of your blog. Publishing the blog to a custom domain, like renaming the blog, will affect traffic to your blog. The effects of the change will vary from blog to blog, because of the different traffic to every different blog.Followers. People who find your blog because of recommendations by other people.Search engines. Robotic processes which methodically surf your blog, and provide dynamic indexing to people who search for information.Subscribers. People who read your content from their newsfeed reader, such as the dashboard Reading List.Viewers. People who read your content from their browser.No two blogs are the same - and no two blogs will have the same combinations of traffic sources.

Stats Components Are Significant, In Their Own Context

One popular Stats related accessory, which displays pageview information to the public, is the "Popular Posts" gadget.

Popular Posts identifies from 1 to 10 of the most popular posts in the blog, by comparing Stats pageview counts. Optional parts of the display of each post are a snippet of text, and an ever popular thumbnail photo.

Like many Stats features, blog owners have found imaginative uses for "Popular Posts" - and overlook the limitations of the gadget. Both the dynamic nature of Stats, and the timing of the various pageview count recalculations, create confusion, when Popular Posts is examined.