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Migration From Blogger Classic To Blogger Beta - Planning The Process

We've been seeing mixed experiences with the migration from Classic to Beta. Some folks are just closing their eyes and jumping - and landing softly with no problems. Others are finding it a bit of a rough landing.

If you spent any amount of time adding custom components to your template, when you set the blog up originally, it's possible that the migration process won't easily convert your custom template. You might want to do a little planning, and experimentation, before you migrate.
  • Most standard template objects can be created in the Page Layout editor. Try setting up a Google account, with a new Beta blog, using a template similar to yours. Add your custom features, and see how well it works for you.
  • When you get the invitation to migrate your account, first make a test copy of your blog, using a copy of the template in your Classic blog. Then migrate your account, and convert the test blog first. If you like, you can easily copy the template from the Beta blog that you setup earlier.


A little extra effort might go a long way towards making the template conversion go easier for you, and keep your blog operating for your readers. It's your choice - and I know what I'm going to do.

(Edit 12/14):
This week, having gotten the tap on the shoulder, I did a dry run migration, and identified some interesting issues.

Comments

Anonymous said…
Nice information. I want to know what happens to my AdSense setup on the Old Blogger. Do you have any information on this?
Chuck said…
Hi Kamlesh,

I went back to your other forum post, and added a reply to it.

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